Drawing the Line on Iran

Published February 24, 2006, issue of February 24, 2006.
  • Print
  • Share Share

A spate of recent controversies has shined a spotlight on European efforts to strike a balance between protecting freedom of speech and preventing a revival of the ultranationalist extremism that triggered World War II. In each case — the Muslim riots over the publication of cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, the sentencing of Holocaust denier David Irving by an Austrian court and Jewish efforts in Germany to block an offensive Turkish film — valid arguments are being offered on all sides of the difficult debate.

But in one controversy, right and wrong couldn’t be more clear: In its latest, most offensive effort to deny the Holocaust, Iran has proposed sending a team of experts to Auschwitz to examine the most notorious Nazi death camp.

Officials in Poland, where the killing complex sits, deserve strong praise for quickly and strongly rejecting the idea.

Iran is essentially arguing that, because the religious sensibilities of Muslims were trampled on by the publication of cartoons, the appropriate response is to challenge in the most offensive way possible the torture and murder of 6 million Jews. The notion falls somewhere between depravity and idiocy. It is hard to tell if officials in Tehran are bent on fomenting international tensions or just ignorant enough to think that they would be allowed to march onto hallowed ground and poke through the bones of the Nazi’s victims.

With each reckless move and outrageous declaration, Iran and its confrontational president are making clear the need for a united international front — both in the fight to block Tehran’s pursuit of nuclear weapons and in the battle to rebut those who seek to mask Hitler’s crimes.






Find us on Facebook!
  • Vered Guttman doesn't usually get nervous about cooking for 20 people, even for Passover. But last night was a bit different. She was cooking for the Obamas at the White House Seder.
  • A grumpy Jewish grandfather is wary of his granddaughter's celebrating Easter with the in-laws. But the Seesaw says it might just make her appreciate Judaism more. What do you think?
  • “Twist and Shout.” “Under the Boardwalk.” “Brown-Eyed Girl.” What do these great songs have in common? A forgotten Jewish songwriter. We tracked him down.
  • What can we learn from tragedies like the rampage in suburban Kansas City? For one thing, we must keep our eyes on the real threats that we as Jews face.
  • When is a legume not necessarily a legume? Philologos has the answer.
  • "Sometime in my childhood, I realized that the Exodus wasn’t as remote or as faceless as I thought it was, because I knew a former slave. His name was Hersh Nemes, and he was my grandfather." Share this moving Passover essay!
  • Getting ready for Seder? Chag Sameach! http://jd.fo/q3LO2
  • "We are not so far removed from the tragedies of the past, and as Jews sit down to the Seder meal, this event is a teachable moment of how the hatred of Jews-as-Other is still alive and well. It is not realistic to be complacent."
  • Aperitif Cocktail, Tequila Shot, Tom Collins or Vodka Soda — Which son do you relate to?
  • Elvis craved bacon on tour. Michael Jackson craved matzo ball soup. We've got the recipe.
  • This is the face of hatred.
  • What could be wrong with a bunch of guys kicking back with a steak and a couple of beers and talking about the Seder? Try everything. #ManSeder
  • BREAKING: Smirking killer singled out Jews for death in suburban Kansas City rampage. 3 die in bloody rampage at JCC and retirement home.
  • Real exodus? For Mimi Minsky, it's screaming kids and demanding hubby on way down to Miami, not matzo in the desert.
  • The real heroines of Passover prep aren't even Jewish. But the holiday couldn't happen without them.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.