Books Roundup

By Jacob Suskewicz

Published April 21, 2006, issue of May 19, 2006.
  • Print
  • Share Share

Each season brings a slew of Holocaust-related books, but the spring 2006 line seems to be a particularly rich crop, including tales of personal heroism in the face of extreme danger; historical documents on Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin and Franklin Roosevelt, and even a book of poems that envisions Franz Kafka had he lived to raise a family.

Another European literary giant figures prominently in Steven F. Sage’s Ibsen and Hitler: The Playwright, the Plagiarist, and the Plot for the Third Reich (Carroll & Graf, 384 pages, $28). Sage argues that Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906) was a primary influence on Hitler, and that three of Ibsen’s plays in particular, “An Enemy of the People,” “The Master Builder” and “Emperor and Galilean,” actually presaged or foreshadowed the Third Reich and served as a model for Hitler in implementing key political, diplomatic and even military actions during the war.

On a somewhat more uplifting note, Mark Klempner’s The Heart Has Reasons: Holocaust Rescuers and Their Stories of Courage (Pilgrim Press, 235 pages, $24) tells the stories of Dutch resisters, who placed their own lives in danger and rescued friends and neighbors from the Nazis. Klempner, a folklorist and oral historian, interviews 10 such Holocaust rescuers and uses their personal narratives as a means to find inspiration for his own life, applying the lessons learned from the resistors to find meaning in today’s world.

In children’s books, Rachel Hausfater and Olivier Latyk’s The Little Boy Star: An Allegory of the Holocaust (IBooks/Milk & Cookies Press, 32 pages, $16.95) highlights the darkness of the era in a simple allegory of a child given a Star of David to wear. At first the child is proud to wear the star, but then he begins to disappear. Amy Littlesugar and William Low’s Willy and Max: A Holocaust Story (Philomel, 40 pages, $15.99) uses the account of a stolen painting to show the friendship between two boys in Belgium and the difficulties they face as the Nazi soldiers close in.

* * * * *

Other new and noteworthy books about the Holocaust:

The Jewish Enemy: Nazi Propaganda During World War II and the Holocaust

By Jeffrey Herf

Belknap Press (Harvard University), 432 pages, $29.95.

Hitler’s Shadow War: The Holocaust and World War II

By Donald M. McKale

Taylor Trade Publishing, 588 pages, $18.95.

Roosevelt and the Holocaust

By Robert Beir

Barricade Books, 320 pages, $26.95.

Saving the Jews: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Holocaust

By Robert N. Rosen,

Alan M. Dershowitz (Introduction)

Thunder’s Mouth Press, 324 pages, $32.

June 1941: Hitler and Stalin

By John Lukacs

Yale University Press, 192 pages, $25.

Using and Abusing the Holocaust

By Lawrence L. Langer

Indiana University Press, 216 pages, $29.95.

Holocaust Memoir Digest, Vol. 2: A Digest of Published Survivor

Memoirs With Study Guide and Maps

By Esther Goldberg (Editor), Sir Martin Gilbert (Editor)

Vallentine Mitchell, 140 pages, $16.95.

The First and Final Nightmare of Sonia Reich: A Son’s Memoir

By Howard Riech

Public Affairs Press, 272 pages, $22.95.

A High and Hidden Place

By Michele Claire Lucas

HarperSanFrancisco, 304 pages, $13.95

Franz Kafka’s Daughter Meets the Evil Nazi Empire!!!: The Heroism of Roaches Holocaust-Tainted Poems

By Elliot Richman

Leaping Dog Press, 80 pages, $10.






Find us on Facebook!
  • "Selma. Nearly 50 years ago it was violent Selma, impossibly racist Selma, site of Bloody Sunday, when peaceful civil rights marchers made their first attempt to cross the Pettus Street Bridge on the way to the state capitol in Montgomery, Alabama." http://jd.fo/r50mf With the 50th anniversary approaching next spring, a new coalition is bringing together blacks, Jews and others for progressive change.
  • Kosovo's centuries-old Jewish community is down to a few dozen. In a nation where the population is 90% Muslim, they are proud their past — and wonder why Israel won't recognize their state. http://jd.fo/h4wK0
  • Israelis are taking up the #IceBucketChallenge — with hummus.
  • In WWI, Jews fought for Britain. So why were they treated as outsiders?
  • According to a new poll, 75% of Israeli Jews oppose intermarriage.
  • Will Lubavitcher Rabbi Moshe Wiener be the next Met Council CEO?
  • Angelina Jolie changed everything — but not just for the better:
  • Prime Suspect? Prime Minister.
  • Move over Dr. Ruth — there’s a (not-so) new sassy Jewish sex-therapist in town. Her name is Shirley Zussman — and just turned 100 years old.
  • From kosher wine to Ecstasy, presenting some of our best bootlegs:
  • Sara Kramer is not the first New Yorker to feel the alluring pull of the West Coast — but she might be the first heading there with Turkish Urfa pepper and za’atar in her suitcase.
  • About 1 in 40 American Jews will get pancreatic cancer (Ruth Bader Ginsberg is one of the few survivors).
  • At which grade level should classroom discussions include topics like the death of civilians kidnapping of young Israelis and sirens warning of incoming rockets?
  • Wanted: Met Council CEO.
  • “Look, on the one hand, I understand him,” says Rivka Ben-Pazi, a niece of Elchanan Hameiri, the boy that Henk Zanoli saved. “He had a family tragedy.” But on the other hand, she said, “I think he was wrong.” What do you think?
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.