January 21, 2011

Looking Back

Published January 12, 2011, issue of January 21, 2011.

100 Years Ago in the Forward

Our Gallery of Disappeared Men features photographs and descriptions of men who have abandoned their wives and families, often leaving them with nothing. The purpose behind the feature is to find the men and force them to pay some kind of restitution to their families. But now the Forverts has come across a number of women who have done the unexpected and left their husbands and families. In fact, three women from Manhattan’s Lower East Side were recently reported to have disappeared. East Eighth Street residents Gussie and Aina Goldstein, both 25, left their husbands and children for boarders who had been staying at their homes. And 29-year-old Paula Gordon of Henry Street also disappeared with one of her boarders.


75 Years Ago in the Forward

Considering the political situation in Germany, the Jewish stores in Berlin aren’t what they used to be. But there are still a few around, and we sent a correspondent to interview some of the owners. One of them, a Jew originally from Poland, owns a clothing store on the Friedrichstrasse. “Clothing,” he said, “isn’t in short supply, thank God.” And after having been stripped of his civil rights, his store is all he has. But he is still worried that he will lose the right to sell his wares. When asked if most of his customers are Jewish, he laughed and said: “Of course not. It’s just like before; most customers are Germans. From time to time we also get a Jewish customer.”


50 Years Ago in the Forward

Former SS officer Franz Nowak admitted to being Adolf Eichmann’s right-hand man in the process of the destruction of European Jewry. Nowak, who was recently arrested, admitted his guilt immediately following his capture. A printer by profession, Nowak was initially assigned to the Office of Jewish Emigration, in Vienna, before being brought to Berlin to work as the “technical expert” in the deportation of Jews. Subsequent to that, in 1944, he served as a special deputy to Eichmann in Budapest. After the war’s end, Nowak lived in Austria under an assumed name, but he was so sure that he wouldn’t be caught that he resumed living under his real name in the village of Langenzersdorf. When he was caught, he said that he would admit everything so long as he would not be sent for trial in Israel.



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