Shimon Peres Opposes Attack on Iran

Israeli President Tells CNN Sanctions Should Get Chance

By Haaretz

Published November 15, 2011.

The international community should engage in a “moral” attack on Iran, not a military one, President Shimon Peres said in an interview on Monday, adding that Tehran’s support of terror was as much a global concern as the economic crisis.

Peres’ comments came after the United Nation’s nuclear watchdog released a report last week, which stated there was evidence that Iran was working to achieve nuclear weapons capabilities.

Israel and the United States have said the report proved that the world needed to do more to stop Iran’s nuclear ambitions, urging fiercer sanctions against the Islamic Republic.

Speaking to CNN’s Pierce Morgan on Monday, Peres said that he felt a military option was not the first option at hand to thwart Iran’s race for a nuclear bomb, saying he “wouldn’t suggest to start immediately with a military operation.”

“I would rather prefer to see tighter economic sanctions, closer political pressure and what is lacking very much is an attack in the moral sense,” the president said, calling Iran “a spoiled country, it’s morally corrupt.”

“They are the only country threatening to destroy another country, openly. They arrest the opposition, they shoot around, they spread arms, they encourage every center of terror all over the world,” Peres added.

Peres also rejected the notion that Israel would act alone against Iran’s nuclear program, saying that “Israel will first of all see what the world is doing.”

“We don’t want to jump alone, we are part of the civilization of the family of international responsible countries and we expect that leaders that make a promise will fulfill it,” he added.

The president also reiterated the Israeli position that Iran was not an exclusively Israeli problem, saying that the menace of Iran’s terror network was as global as the economic crisis.

“It’s a danger. And today terror is a global matter, very much like economy. They can arrive, [like in] 9/11, to New York, they can arrive to Chechnya, they can arrive to Moscow. It’s mobile and its dangerous,” he said, adding: “So I don’t think we have to feel alone in that respect.”

For more, go to Haaretz.com



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