What We Forgot About Pearl Harbor

Why Did it Take America So Long To Fight Against Tyranny?

Learn From Past: America waited far too long to join the fight against fascism, and paid the price in Hawaii.
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Learn From Past: America waited far too long to join the fight against fascism, and paid the price in Hawaii.

By J.J. Goldberg

Published November 29, 2011, issue of December 02, 2011.

It was 70 years ago, on December 7, 1941, that Japanese warplanes staged their infamous surprise attack on the American naval base at Pearl Harbor, thrusting America headlong into the cataclysm of World War II.

Seventy years is a long time. The sages of the Talmud cited the 70th year as the point where life’s vigor begins fading rapidly to gray: ben shivim la-seyvah. It’s a time to start summing up before passing on to the next great journey. The survivors of the attack themselves have picked this 70th year to shut down their Pearl Harbor Survivors association, because the few who remain can no longer make it to the annual reunions. For the rest of us, this might be the time to start asking what it all means. What have we learned in 70 years? No less important, what have we forgotten?

Let’s start with two very big things we’ve learned. First, that there are times when you can’t run away from a fight, when you have to stand and face evil, when nothing will do but to struggle and win.

Second, that America is the essential nation. It is not enough to be a beacon of democracy and freedom: We must be their defender as well. There is no greatness in solitude, nor honor in indifference.

All this might seem obvious today, but it was not obvious on the morning of December 7, 1941. Europe had been at war for 27 months. Nearly the entire continent had fallen to the Nazis and their henchmen, leaving England to fight on, all but alone. And we were not part of it. The wars of Europe were no concern of the American people. It took a Japanese attack on our soil to stir us to battle.

The following day, December 8, President Franklin Roosevelt addressed Congress and asked for a declaration of war, and within an hour Congress declared war — on Japan. Three days later, Japan’s German and Italian allies declared war on us. It was thus that we found ourselves at war with the evil of Nazism.

That’s one thing we’ve forgotten.

There are other lessons. We learned at Munich in September 1938, when the British prime minister allowed Hitler to dismember Czechoslovakia, that evil cannot be appeased, that peace cannot be bought through capitulation. We are reminded again and again that if Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain had stood up to Hitler at Munich, things might have unfolded differently later on. When war was finally forced on Britain by Hitler’s invasion of Poland a year later, in September 1939, the stakes had risen frightfully high. Nazism was now on the ascendant all across Europe. By the time America entered the war in December 1941, civilization itself was fighting for its life and the future of the Jewish people hung in the balance.

This lesson is brought home again every time another liberal seeks to negotiate with a new enemy and reach some sort of peaceful compromise. We are called on by tough-minded realists of the right to remember Munich. We should have made our stand then and not waited for the invasion of Poland, when all of Europe lay at Hitler’s feet.

But we forget: We were not there at Munich. We were not even there in 1939, at the fall of Poland. Once Britain took the plunge, we left it to fight alone for 27 months.

The biggest question we don’t ask is why it took America two years to join the fight. The answer is no secret — we’ve simply forgotten most of it. Roosevelt spent those two years warning of the Nazi menace, warning that America could not stand alone, that once all of Europe had fallen America would not be spared. Republicans called him a warmonger. The conservative press mocked him as “Franklin Rosenfeld,” conniving to drag America into a foreign war for the sake of the Jews.



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