Bringing 'Darkness' To Light

Agnieszka Holland's Holocaust Drama Shortlisted for Oscars

In A Dark Place: Agnieszka Holland’s Oscar-nominated ‘Into Darkness’ focuses on a Polish sewer worker who helps Jews escape the Holocaust.
courtesy of sony pictures
In A Dark Place: Agnieszka Holland’s Oscar-nominated ‘Into Darkness’ focuses on a Polish sewer worker who helps Jews escape the Holocaust.

By Eva Fogelman

Published January 25, 2012, issue of February 03, 2012.
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Holland’s own family saga resonates with the theme of victim and rescuer. Her father was a Polish Jew who lost most of his family in the Warsaw Ghetto; her mother, a Polish Catholic, has been designated by the State of Israel, via Yad Vashem, as a “Righteous Among the Nations of the World” for having saved Jews in Warsaw.

“In Darkness” is not just another slick thriller. Actors voice impeccably accented Polish, German, Ukrainian and Yiddish, and even daven Jewish prayers in Hebrew, lending the film verisimilitude. Water streaming through the tunnels, strange noises that echoed and died, vermin, the maze of holes and tunnels and narrow spaces, darkness. The stench, the dank, the cold of the sewer felt immediate.

Comparisons with Schindler, especially Steven Spielberg’s Schindler, are unavoidable. When an ethnically German Nazi Party member like Schindler decided to save Jews, he became vulnerable to criticism and loss of rank, but was most likely protected from execution. Not so for an ordinary Polish citizen whose one wrong move would mean the end for him and his family. The tension in “In Darkness” builds as, time and again, Socha and his wife and daughter are a hair’s breadth from death. One hair-raising moment takes place when a Ukrainian officer pays a surprise visit to Socha’s home and starts eating the food that’s on the table. Their little girl shouts out not to eat the food, because it is for “their Jews.” While her parents are shocked into silence and bone-chilling fear, the little girl cleverly says that her dolls are “my Jews.”

Over time, Socha, played by award-winning actor Robert Wieckiewicz, saw the Jews as human beings like himself. Socha was an observant Catholic, and he respected the Jews’ religious beliefs. He brought them candles for the Sabbath and matzo for the Passover Seder. When a flood in the sewer threatens the lives of the Jews, Socha, in coat and tie and in the midst of his own daughter’s christening, leaves the celebration to plunge into the sewer waters to save his Jews from drowning.

Even under extreme conditions, lovers want to enjoy each other, children want to play, adults want to be entertained by youngsters, believers want to pray and nonbelievers are irritated with their meaningless rituals. When men and women are confronted with the brutal question of who should live and who should die, the will to live demands a selfish incivility from the individual. “In Darkness” does not shy away from the portrayal of the unthinkable: Jews killing a newborn, lest the baby endanger the lives of others.

When the Russians liberate Lvov at the close of the film, the Polish onlookers are not overjoyed with the idea that the Jews — whom they thought had all been killed — are coming back, climbing out of the sewers. Socha’s wife (known in the film as Wanda), acted by the peerless Kinga Preis, who had her own ambivalent feelings about Socha’s rescue efforts, is overjoyed at their survival and, unlike her fellow townspeople, greets them with baked goods and drinks. The secret act of saving Jews becomes public, and the rescuers are forever tainted and live as pariahs among their townspeople, a pattern that has received scant attention over the decades.

Though she was not portrayed in the film, Halina Wind was a young woman in the sewers of Lvov who never forgot her rescuers. In 1977 — now Halina Wind Preston — she went from America to give testimony at Yad Vashem in support of honoring Socha and his wife, Magdalena (fictionalized in the film as Wanda), as well as their helpers, Stefan Wroblewski (fictionalized in the film as Stefek) and his wife. Preston continued to correspond with and send packages of food and clothing to the rescuers and their families for many years. A year before her death, in 1981, Preston dedicated the Garden of the Righteous at the entrance to Wilmington, Del.’s Jewish community center. By not shirking the dirt, the danger or the darkness, Holland’s movie enables us to remember and honor those righteous Poles.

Eva Fogelman is the founding director of the Jewish Foundation for Christian Rescuers (now the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous) and author of “Conscience and Courage: Rescuers of Jews During the Holocaust” (Doubleday, 1994).


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