Two Families and One Lifeboat

Getting to Truth of Titanic Story About Selfless Act

Survivors: Above, from the pages of the Forverts, a photo of 10 Jewish women and children who were taken in by the Hospitality Society. At center is Beile Moor and her son, Meier, 7.
FORWARD ASSOCIATION/dorot jewish division, NYPL
Survivors: Above, from the pages of the Forverts, a photo of 10 Jewish women and children who were taken in by the Hospitality Society. At center is Beile Moor and her son, Meier, 7.

By Michael Hirsch

Published April 11, 2012, issue of April 13, 2012.
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On Friday, April 19, 1912, 10 Jewish survivors of the ill-fated luxury liner RMS Titanic posed for a Forverts photographer in the offices of the Hospitality Society on East Broadway. The sad group included only a few of the 705 survivors who had been rescued by the steamship RMS Carpathia and who had arrived in New York City the previous day. Standing near the center was 27-year-old Beile Moor, whose hands rested protectively on the shoulders of her 7-year-old son, Meier. Along with their frightful memories of the sinking of the gigantic ship, the mother and son carried with them the mystery of how they had been saved.

That mystery has been passed down through the generations, told over and over again, until it has become as much a part of the family’s history as the fact that Moor and her son were on board that palatial ship on the night it sank into the sea. The mystery is this: Who was the wealthy woman who gave up her place in the lifeboat, making room for them?

Only a few sparse facts are available from the family’s early history. Meier Moor (later known as Meyer Moore) was born somewhere in the Russian Empire on November 7, 1904. His father, whose name is now unknown to the family, had died or would soon die in the Russo-Japanese war. According to family lore, pogroms forced Beile and her son to make a hasty and dangerous journey to England, where she found work as a seamstress. The mother and son lived with family members already established there. In time, she determined to immigrate to the United States to join family members in Chicago. Her first attempt ended in failure, although the reason is unknown. What is known is that in early April of 1912, Moor purchased tickets to make a second try. Originally, she and her son were supposed to travel on the ocean liner the RMS Adriatic, but because of a local labor dispute, they took the Titanic instead.

The switch must have been exciting for them. The Titanic was the most talked about technological marvel of the day, and they would become part of history by traveling on the great ship’s maiden voyage. When the ship set sail from Southampton, England, the mother and son were occupying steerage cabin E -121, located deep in the stern of the ship. The young boy used the days at sea to collect from other passengers the colorful, decorative playing cards included in some cigarette packages of the day. By the evening of April 14, he had amassed a sizable collection. Family lore tells us that for some reason, Beile Moor may have been on one of the Titanic’s upper decks when the ship fatally struck the iceberg, tearing a 300-foot-long gash in the starboard side of the ship.

What happened next would be recounted by her son a number of times during the last few years of his life. Wearing life vests, he and his mother were somehow able to fight the crowds and climb the six flights of stairs leading to the Titanic’s lifeboat deck. The only thing Beile Moor brought with her was her purse, which held the documents they would need for entry into the new world. Neither of them would recall exactly how they got into a lifeboat amid the panic, but both remembered that a space for them opened up when a woman of means gave up her spot. Meyer recalled years later that from the bobbing lifeboat, he watched the Titanic sink, taking with it all those lives and his precious playing cards.

According to the family, continuing immigration difficulties kept the pair from Chicago for another two years, but once there, Beile Moor, who began going by the name “Bella,” opened a dry goods store, married again and thrived. Meyer Moore, too, did well, marrying in 1937 and eventually settling in El Paso, Texas, where he worked as a jobber, selling shoes and dry goods. Moore had three sons and four grandchildren; he passed away in El Paso on April 15, 1975, the 63rd anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic.


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