Conviction, Compassion and Outrage

New York’s Activist History That Changed City and Nation


By Erica Brody

Published May 21, 2012, issue of May 25, 2012.
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Hundreds of dialects can be heard in America’s most diverse city, yet New York’s lingua franca is the language of change. Natives or newbies, New Yorkers are known for voicing strong views about why things need to be different. Here, love and hate spur movements, mobilize the masses, draw people into the streets and across bridges under banners. New Yorkers’ convictions, compassion and outrage have driven the city’s history and transformation, setting national precedents and seeding ideas. They still do.

These triumphs and tumults make up the heart of a new exhibit that opened on May 4 at the Museum of the City of New York. “Activist New York” tells the tale of the city’s change-makers as a love story, a tribute to everyday denizens who stand up and speak out. It provides snippets from more than 350 years of New York activist history, focusing on 14 episodes and using a set of interactive tools that connect the city’s past to its present.

In 1943, a plan to raze Manhattan’s Gas House District got a green light, clearing the way for Stuyvesant Town, a 72-acre housing project that would straddle the streets between East 14th and East 20th. The Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. development promised affordable housing amid landscaped greenery, made possible by a 25-year tax exemption from the city and the controversial use of eminent domain. Applications flooded in, mainly from white veterans. Among the many objections New Yorkers brought forward as the red brick buildings rose was the “No Negroes” policy. It took nearly a decade of organizing, picketing, court battles and direct action before the city-in-a-city reversed its policy, thanks in large part to the efforts of such groups as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the American Civil Liberties Union and the American Jewish Congress.

It wasn’t the first time Peter Stuyvesant’s name was tied to denying civil rights, or that Jews acted alongside others to expand them. From the get-go, New York Jews joined Quakers, Lutherans and Baptists to fight for religious tolerance and “to agitate and expand their rights — to own property, engage in trade, and serve in the military,” according to the exhibit’s wall text. In 1654, the governor of the Dutch colony tried to expel the city’s first two Jews. Asser Levy’s 1677 property deed stands testament to Stuyvesant’s failure, and in the exhibit it can be found near the original Flushing Remonstrance, a 1657 landmark document that protested religious restrictions against Quakers.

These two historical episodes illustrate how activists, by building movements beyond their communities, gained power and impact for generations to come.

As a native New Yorker committed to social justice since my teens, I found it revitalizing to stand face to face with the details. Small items such as letters, photographs, posters, videos, news clippings, medals and pins show how New Yorkers pushed our nation to do better not just through the big changes, but also through the many tiny ones. Before laws change, ideas must gain momentum, and New York has been a gateway for many of those ideas.

Women’s faces and legacies are often sparse in history exhibits. Yet that’s not the case in “Activist New York,” which highlights the actions of women who made it easier for everyone to live a life of dignity in America. There’s Lillian Wald, founder of the Henry Street Settlement and the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. Wald made headlines in the late 19th and early 20th centuries with the ambitious settlement movement, which sought to alleviate poverty by addressing its underlying causes. Settlement workers lived in the communities they served, and brought health care, education and social services to the people who most needed them, including the immigrants of the Lower East Side.


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