Time To Rethink the New York Jew

Study Leaves Out Suburbs and Ignores Splits Among Orthodox

Younger, Poorer and More Orthodox: A new study says a lot about New York’s changing Jewish population. But there’s much it leaves out, too.
getty images
Younger, Poorer and More Orthodox: A new study says a lot about New York’s changing Jewish population. But there’s much it leaves out, too.

By J.J. Goldberg

Published June 15, 2012, issue of June 22, 2012.
  • Print
  • Share Share
  • Single Page

If you’re thinking that the newly released survey of New York’s Jewish population looks uncannily familiar, like you’ve seen it somewhere before, that’s because you have. The astonishing trends unearthed by UJA-Federation of New York’s researchers bear a striking resemblance to the much-reported demographic patterns currently keeping Israeli leaders awake at night.

What both great Jewish communities are discovering is an exploding population of Haredi Jews — also known as black-hat or ultra-Orthodox — who are profoundly disconnected from the broader Jewish population, from secular education, Western culture and the modern economy. Coupled with that, galloping Jewish poverty on a scale no one imagined a generation ago, with large and growing Haredi families the biggest single driver, though by no means the only one.

There are critical differences. In Israel, the dilemma of the Haredi population boom is sharpened by the wholesale exemption of Haredi young men from army service, putting the burden of the country’s defense on an ever-shrinking non-Haredi share of the population. Israel’s political leadership is currently mulling ways to end the exemption and begin drafting Haredi youth en masse, but Haredi leaders vow to fight it “to the death,” as numerous senior rabbis have declared.

In New York, the increasing heft of the Haredi community is amplified by the actual shrinking of the non-Orthodox population. Conservative and Reform families are producing growing numbers of unaffiliated and uncommitted young Jews who, in turn, form interfaith families, most of whose children are not raised as Jews. That’s what the new survey shows, in meticulous detail.

Looking at recent population figures in the world’s two largest Jewish communities, it’s not entirely fanciful to wonder if the modern Jewish experience of the past two centuries — the culture that produced Einstein and Freud, Gershwin and Chagall, Kafka, Buber, Ayn Rand, Jonas Salk, Betty Friedan and Bob Dylan, not to mention the sovereign Jewish state of Israel — isn’t turning out to be a historical blip.

Before we let our imaginations run away with us, several caveats are in order. First and foremost, that new survey of New York-area Jews isn’t really a survey of New York-area Jews. It’s a survey of Jews in eight of the 23 counties comprising the New York metropolitan area. It covers the five boroughs of New York City plus Long Island and Westchester, including 1.54 million Jews in an overall population of about 12 million. Why only these? Because they happen to be the counties whose Jewish institutions are organized and funded by UJA-Federation of New York, for obscure historical reasons. The federation needs to know what services to provide to whom and where; hence the survey.

The other 15 suburban counties of the New York metropolitan area — two in upstate New York, three in Connecticut and 10 in New Jersey, combined population about 7 million, including upward of 500,000 Jews — are served by a dozen-odd smaller Jewish federations. Some conduct their own surveys. Others don’t.

This is important because most of the startling findings in the new survey are located within the five boroughs of New York City, including 92% of the rapidly growing Orthodox population, 92% of the large Russian-speaking Jewish community and 78% of the 361,000 poor Jews. The suburban Jewish communities, comprising about half of metropolitan New York’s roughly 2.2 million Jews, look very much like Jewish communities elsewhere in the country. They include small but growing Orthodox populations — 10% or more, up from 6% or 7% in recent decades — and surprising levels of poverty, mainly seniors, single-parent households, disabled and growing numbers of unemployed.


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • Jon Stewart responds to his critics: “Look, obviously there are many strong opinions on this. But just merely mentioning Israel or questioning in any way the effectiveness or humanity of Israel’s policies is not the same thing as being pro-Hamas.”
  • "My bat mitzvah party took place in our living room. There were only a few Jewish kids there, and only one from my Sunday school class. She sat in the corner, wearing the right clothes, asking her mom when they could go." The latest in our Promised Lands series — what state should we visit next?
  • Former Israeli National Security Advisor Yaakov Amidror: “A cease-fire will mean that anytime Hamas wants to fight it can. Occupation of Gaza will bring longer-term quiet, but the price will be very high.” What do you think?
  • Should couples sign a pre-pregnancy contract, outlining how caring for the infant will be equally divided between the two parties involved? Just think of it as a ketubah for expectant parents:
  • Many #Israelis can't make it to bomb shelters in time. One of them is Amos Oz.
  • According to Israeli professor Mordechai Kedar, “the only thing that can deter terrorists, like those who kidnapped the children and killed them, is the knowledge that their sister or their mother will be raped."
  • Why does ultra-Orthodox group Agudath Israel of America receive its largest donation from the majority owners of Walmart? Find out here: http://jd.fo/q4XfI
  • Woody Allen on the situation in #Gaza: It's “a terrible, tragic thing. Innocent lives are lost left and right, and it’s a horrible situation that eventually has to right itself.”
  • "Mark your calendars: It was on Sunday, July 20, that the momentum turned against Israel." J.J. Goldberg's latest analysis on Israel's ground operation in Gaza:
  • What do you think?
  • "To everyone who is reading this article and saying, “Yes, but… Hamas,” I would ask you to just stop with the “buts.” Take a single moment and allow yourself to feel this tremendous loss. Lay down your arms and grieve for the children of Gaza."
  • Professor Dan Markel, 41 years old, was found shot and killed in his Tallahassee home on Friday. Jay Michaelson can't explain the death, just grieve for it.
  • Employees complained that the food they received to end the daily fast during the holy month of Ramadan was not enough (no non-kosher food is allowed in the plant). The next day, they were dismissed.
  • Why are peace activists getting beat up in Tel Aviv? http://jd.fo/s4YsG
  • Backstreet's...not back.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.