Jews Failed to Spot Hitler's Menace

Americans and Germans Were Slow To See the Nazi Danger

Rising Menace: Despite the obvious writing on the wall, many American and German Jews failed to adequately recognize the devastating threat posed by Nazism.
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Rising Menace: Despite the obvious writing on the wall, many American and German Jews failed to adequately recognize the devastating threat posed by Nazism.

By Andrew Nagorski

Published June 19, 2012, issue of June 22, 2012.

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After Kristallnacht, which took place November 8 and 9, 1938, and the September 1, 1939, German invasion of Poland that launched World War II, there was near panic among German Jews, and they besieged the U.S. Embassy in Berlin seeking visas. But given the strict quota system the United States maintained, even consular officials who were sympathetic to their plight ended up turning away many of them.

And some Americans in Germany became hardened to the desperate appeals of local Jews. Howard K. Smith, a young reporter who would later go on to be the co-anchor of the ABC Evening News, received a knock on his door at 2 a.m. in October 1941 from a young Jew who reported that he had been briefly detained by the Gestapo, which was raiding apartments of Jews across town. He pleaded for Smith’s help in getting an American visa. As Smith wrote in his memoir about his Berlin experiences, he told his visitor that he was exaggerating the danger, and then he offered him a cigarette and shoved him out the door. To his credit, Smith felt guilty later and wrote about his “callousness,” but noted that there was little he could have done in any case.

By contrast, some Americans displayed remarkable courage. Muriel White, an American woman who had married a German count in 1909 and settled in Germany, attended a dinner at the Adlon Hotel, in Berlin, in the summer of 1937. An American diplomat witnessed her exchange with a gauleiter, a Nazi district leader, seated at her table. She asked him whether it was true that the party sometimes called “deserving” Jews honorary Aryans. When he replied in the affirmative, she asked, “Can you tell me, then, how I could become an honorary Jew?”

Despite the overall American record of failing to marshal anything close to an adequate response to what was happening to Jews in Germany and later in Nazi-occupied Europe, there were other acts of courage and compassion — although not necessarily with happy endings. Murphy didn’t forget about his German Jewish colleague, Drey, after the Nazis took power. As late as 1938, Murphy flew back to Munich to urge him to flee the country, assuring his friend that he’d find a job for him elsewhere. Drey thanked him but turned him down, saying that the “temporary madness” in his country would soon pass. Drey died later in Dachau.

With the benefit of hindsight, such behavior appears perplexing, even infuriating. But for many well-educated Jews, non-Jews, Germans and Americans, Hitler’s rants and behavior seemed too bizarre, too far removed from any rational frame of reference, to be taken seriously. Which is why so many appeared to be in denial about what was happening until it was too late.

The fact that Jews were no exception in this regard is not a reason for shame. But it is a reason for reflection.

Andrew Nagorski, a former Newsweek foreign correspondent, is the author of “Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power.”



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