Shomrim Don't Want Police To See Security Video

In Leiby's Area, Patrol Wants To Keep Some Crimes Quiet

Keep Lid on Crime? Leaders of the Orthodox Shomrim patrol do not want police to have access to security video in Brooklyn’s Boro Park neighborhood. They fear authorities may prosecute domestic crimes the community would rather keep quiet.
josh nathan-kazis
Keep Lid on Crime? Leaders of the Orthodox Shomrim patrol do not want police to have access to security video in Brooklyn’s Boro Park neighborhood. They fear authorities may prosecute domestic crimes the community would rather keep quiet.

By Josh Nathan-Kazis

Published August 08, 2012, issue of August 17, 2012.

(page 2 of 2)

A spokesman for Hikind said that the assemblyman would not be interviewed for this story.

Daskal, whose Shomrim organization is often the first group called by Orthodox crime victims in Boro Park, is not opposed to the notion of more cameras in the neighborhood. But instead of Hikind’s centralized, police-accessible system, Daskal said he preferred an arrangement by which individual yeshivas would receive state funding for their own private security cameras to monitor the streets.

“I am trying to change the system [so] that it shouldn’t go to [a] central thing,” Daskal told the Forward.

It’s unclear whether Daskal is having any success in pushing his reforms to the surveillance system. A Hikind spokesman said that Hikind would speak publicly about the program once it “rolls out.” He gave no indication as to when that would happen.

Private security cameras played a key role in the search for Leiby. The murdered boy’s alleged killer, Levi Aron, was eventually found after security footage of Leiby pointed police to the suspect.

The Shomrim’s role in the search for Leiby was controversial. The group launched a massive hunt for the boy, combing the neighborhood and distributing fliers, after family members contacted it. But the Shomrim were criticized for waiting almost three hours after being alerted to Leiby’s disappearance before contacting the police. Questions were also raised about whether the group had been warned earlier about Aron, and whether it knew of other alleged molesters whose names it had not shared with the police.

Daskal defended his organization’s actions during the search for Leiby. He said that though the Shomrim generally rely on witnesses and complainants to contact the police, in this case they called the police themselves after they realized that Leiby’s father hadn’t done so.

Daskal also said that some of the breaks in the case had come through the work of Shomrim volunteers rather than through the police. Still, he admitted that there were lessons for the Shomrim in Leiby’s murder. A year ago, Shomrim searchers were content to return the next morning to check surveillance cameras in closed stores. If a similar situation were to happen again, they wouldn’t wait. “We learned that you have to be aggressive,” Daskal said.

Contact Josh Nathan-Kazis at nathankazis@forward.com or on Twitter @joshnathankazis



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