The Disappearing Yiddish Accent

Language Isn't Dying But Some Dialects Are Fading Fast

By Eddy Portnoy

Published August 13, 2012.
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They say that Yiddish has been dying for the past 200 years. Up until about 50 or 60 years ago, saying as much was kind of a crude bluff, but now it would be a lie to say that Yiddish hasn’t been severely diminished. According to UNESCO’s most recent list of endangered languages, Yiddish falls into the category of “definitely endangered.” But what, exactly, is in danger here? Yes, secular Yiddish already needs a walker, but Haredi Yiddish has, in fact, ever-increasing numbers of speakers.

Contemporary Haredi Yiddish, however, is probably not your bubbe’s Yiddish. That is to say, it’s not exactly the Yiddish of the masses of Jewish immigrants that washed up on America’s shores during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is unquestionably a branch on the tree of Yiddish, but it’s more a product of a Yeshivish bunker culture than a Yiddish culture wide open to new worlds of literature, theater and art, as early 20th-century Yiddish was.

When a language slips into oblivion, a culture also disappears. Sometimes aspects of disappeared languages resurface in other languages and cultures, such as the many Yiddish words that have been given second lives in English, serving as an example of how integrated Yiddish speakers were in general society. But before American English embraced Yiddish words, Yiddish speakers spoke English with an accent: the linguistic bridge between languages. As Yiddish speakers traded one language for another, they invariably entered the new one with the accent of the old, wrapping their English in the warm, lilting tones of Yiddish.

Sadly, the classic Eastern European Yiddish accent, the linguistic stepping stone that both bridged and divided generations, would probably garner a “critically endangered” classification if UNESCO had such a list for accents. Once a common linguistic feature of places like Miami Beach and Manhattan’s Upper West Side, one hardly hears a genuine Yiddish accent anymore.

Haredi Yiddish, dominated as it is by Satmar Hasidim, doesn’t have the traditional Yiddish accent of most Eastern European Jewish immigrants. Nor does the Yiddish of younger Yiddishists, who employ more muted tones when they speak. This links them to the older generation of Yiddish scholars who assiduously studied the folk masses, but certainly didn’t want to speak like them. While both of these groups speak English, or some other vernacular, it certainly isn’t with an accent that is recognizable as a Yiddish one. So when the last Yiddish-speaking immigrant shuffles off this mortal coil, Yiddish will certainly live on, but its bridge to other vernaculars, the traditional accent, will die a silent death.

Once one of the most widely used comic foils in show business, the Yiddish accent has been used to garner laughs for more than a century. From the early days of Vaudeville, the Yiddish accent has been a consistent producer of quality laughs. In fact, the Yiddish accent was once such a staple of early 20th-century dialect humor that numerous accent instruction books and joke books were published to guide performers toward the perfect Yiddish accent.

Moreover, the Yiddish accent was popular: Cartoonist Milt Gross’s books, which featured Yiddish-dialect versions of Poe’s “The Raven,” Longfellow’s “Hiawatha” and classics like “It Was the Night Before Christmas,” were often best-sellers — and it wasn’t just Jews who bought them.


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