Julia Child's Jewish Proteges

French Chef Inspired Them To Explore Own Cuisine

By Leah Koenig

Published August 14, 2012, issue of August 17, 2012.
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Perhaps more than anything, however, it was Child’s insatiable curiosity about her colleagues and about the world that encouraged a generation of Jewish cooks and writers to find their vision and voices. When Nathan was in her early 30s, Child appeared as an unexpected participant on a Jewish food tour of Philadelphia that she was leading. “All of a sudden, she just showed up!” Nathan said. “At first I had no idea why she would want to be there.” As it turns out, Child’s family had recently welcomed a Jewish person, through marriage, so Child wanted to learn more about Jewish cuisine.

In the late 1990s, Child made a guest appearance on Nathan’s public television show, “Jewish Cooking in America,” for an episode about kosher eating. “We walked down the aisles of a kosher fish market, and she asked such great questions in her trademark high-pitched voice,” Nathan said.

“She was the ideal interested bystander,” said baker and cookbook author Alice Medrich, who made a chocolate raspberry ruffle cake in 1996 as a guest on Julia’s television show, “Baking With Julia.” Child was not shy about sharing advice. Medrich remembers her saying, “Now, Dearie, if you have to run the mixer for a while, say what you need to say first and then shut up.” And yet she always encouraged her guest to be the expert and the star. “I’m so appreciative of how she mentored so many cooks in our generation,” Medrich said.

Her genuine interest in all things culinary granted permission for young chefs to explore their own passions, whether that meant brioche, like it did for Medrich, or the world’s Jewish cuisines. Author Faye Levy remembers Child suggesting that she write “a really thorough and high-class book on Jewish cooking” when they corresponded by mail in the mid-1970s. And in 1991, when Levy published her “International Jewish Cookbook,” in the introduction she thanked Child for the inspiration. Meanwhile, chef and cookbook author Rozanne Gold said that Child’s devotion to French cooking inspired her own explorations of Israeli cuisine. “Julia taught me to be authentic and find my own way into the food world,” Gold said.

If Child were around today, she would probably reject the notion that she was extraordinary. “I think it would make her uncomfortable how we have turned her into this food saint,” Katzen said. And yet, as a chef, a mentor and a lifelong student, Child was indeed extraordinary. She embodied the adage that when you “follow your bliss” — be it French cuisine, Jewish food or anything else — life will be delicious both in the kitchen and out of it.

What is your favorite memory of Julia Child? Share it with us below.

Leah Koenig writes a monthly column on food and culinary trends. Contact her at ingredients@forward.com.


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