Ignoring Anti-Semitism Is Sometimes Best

Exposing Hatred Isn't Always a Good Way To Eradicate It

To Protest or Not: Is it always a good idea to shine the light of protest on anti-Semitism?
COURTESY OF TEMPLE UNIVERSITY
To Protest or Not: Is it always a good idea to shine the light of protest on anti-Semitism?

By David Bernstein

Published August 21, 2012, issue of August 24, 2012.
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Nearly 100 years ago, Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis famously coined the phrase “sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants” in praise of transparency and honesty in public policy. Not long after, Jewish communal organizations (within which Brandeis was an active supporter of the Zionist cause) appropriated the phrase for their own purposes, suggesting that exposing anti-Semitism was the best way to eradicate it from the public domain.

The theory behind the sunlight rule was that exposing anti-Semitism would provoke a negative public response and thereby delegitimize it as an acceptable form of discourse in the eyes of the public. Such a conclusion was understandable in the civil rights era, when a mass movement challenging racism and bigotry sparked a widespread shift in public attitudes and laws. Exposing hatred marginalized it.

But as the political hatred of Jews has taken on new and less obvious forms in recent decades, it has become apparent that sunlight can act not only as a disinfectant, but also as a spotlight, and have the exact opposite of the intended effect.

While it may be obvious to most Jews that the denial of the Jewish right to national independence is a form of anti-Jewish bigotry, it is not always recognized as such by others. Thus, publicly condemning anti-Israelism may do more to reproduce the bigotry than to drive it underground. The exposure can take an idea that at one time would have received little attention and propel it into public consciousness, leading to greater acceptance rather than to rejection.

A recent study by Israel’s Foreign Ministry confirmed that annual ritualized condemnations of the Jewish state on American college campuses receive nearly all their diminutive media coverage from Israeli or Jewish sources. Indeed, Ali Abunimah, a prominent American anti-Israelist active on campus, has even thanked the pro-Israel community for the publicity.

This is not to say that the Jewish community should do nothing in response to such hostility. When, for example, a conference designed to promote Israel’s isolation came to the University of Pennsylvania last winter, the local Hillel wisely mobilized students to hold dozens of Sabbath dinners with non-Jewish leaders around campus to talk about Israel. These dinners reached many times more people than the paltry student showing at the conference, and didn’t run the risk of feeding into publicity for the event.

Some see the failure to speak out against every vicious attack as evidence of weakness or trepidation among Jews reminiscent of the days of the European Jewish ghetto. And perhaps that mentality still does exist among some in the Jewish world. But today the sparing use of power is more often evidence of strength and political maturity.


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