Holocaust Memoir Fraud Inspires Novel

Ben Stein's Great Book Challenges Sentimental Link to History


By Joshua Furst

Published October 15, 2012, issue of October 19, 2012.
  • Print
  • Share Share
  • Single Page

(page 2 of 2)

Zichroni, whose story takes the form of a sentimental education, is a Haredi from the Mea Shearim neighborhood in Jerusalem who is shipped off to Switzerland at the age of 15, after the rabbi at his yeshiva discovers him reading Oscar Wilde instead of the Gemara he’d been assigned. Zichroni’s story is one of gradual movement out of an old world, with its strictures and rituals, to a new one full of possibilities for a balanced relationship between the spiritual and the secular.

As he travels from Israel to Europe to the United States and back again, he is taken in by a variety of mentors: his uncle Nathan, an orthodox bachelor and jeweler who becomes his guardian; his chavrusa (study) partner Eli, who introduces him to the esoteric teachings of the Musar and Kabbalistic traditions. Zichroni discovers that he has telepathic powers, which he eventually puts to use, absorbing the experiences of others in his capacity as a psychoanalyst with the hope of helping them heal their fractured selves. He meets Minsky. He listens to Minsky’s story. With his telepathic powers, he’s able to verify that the man’s horrific memories are true. The facts matter less than the power of the story.

The Weschler half of the book is an amnesia tale. His life is disrupted one Sabbath when an airline porter delivers a suitcase to his door in Munich, with an apology for having taken so long to track it down. Apparently, Weschler had reported it lost after a trip to Israel the year before, but he has no memory of having taken this trip and no memory of the suitcase. He believes himself to be a contented German citizen, born in East Berlin to Jewish parents, his life defined by his experiences in “the Small Country” under the Soviet regime and his lifelong passion for the great literature of the world. Despite the difficulty of doing so in Germany, he’s careful to follow the Orthodox Jewish traditions.

But there’s another Weschler, who might just be him, and this Weschler is Swiss and wholly secular in his Judaism, a successful novelist, celebrated for having exposed the hoax that is Minsky and his book. It’s this Weschler to whom the suitcase belongs. As Weschler explores this mystery, his sense of self begins to collapse until, finally, he has to admit that he’s as much of a fraud as he accused Minsky of being. The questions for him then become: How could he have forgotten himself, and why was he so obsessed with Minsky’s lies; and how does this relate to his Orthodox lifestyle? The answer lies in Israel, where the suitcase came from and where, he suspects, his deception originated.

As Weschler’s and Zichroni’s stories begin to collide, the two of them end up together, first bunkered in a West Bank settlement, then groping in the dark at the healing waters of Motza, both of their lives fractured by their relationships with Minsky, but for opposite reasons. Zichroni, the Israeli-born Haredi whose faith in Minsky’s Holocaust story is unwavering, has lost his right to practice anywhere but Israel. His initials are AZ, recalling the phrase “I am the Alpha and Omega” from the Book of Revelation. Weschler, a secular Jew masquerading as a devout one, exposes Minsky’s hoax and becomes a criminal in the land of his people. But his initials are JW, i.e. Jew. Despite, or because of his European sensibilities, his Jewishness is embedded in his personhood.

“The Canvas” is a brave book. Instead of guarding the memory of victimhood that Jewish art so often presents to the world — that sentimental link between the Holocaust and Israel and Jewish identity — it asks, who are we now that we have power in the world? Do we even know ourselves? Are the stories we’ve told ourselves any truer than those others have thrust upon us? And isn’t it time for us to begin building a less divisive, less defensive, more nuanced and expansive identity for ourselves? Isn’t it time for Jews to admit that our lives and culture belong as much to the post-Holocaust Diaspora as to Israel? These are grave, essential questions and Benjamin Stein has written an important book, not just because it asks them but because it strives to find honest answers.

Joshua Furst is a frequent contributor to the Forward. He’s the author, most recently, of ‘The Sabotage Café,’ a novel.


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • What the foolish rabbi of Chelm teaches us about Israel and the Palestinian unity deal:
  • Mazel tov to Idina Menzel on making Variety "Power of Women" cover! http://jd.fo/f3Mms
  • "How much should I expect him and/or ask him to participate? Is it enough to have one parent reciting the prayers and observing the holidays?" What do you think?
  • New York and Montreal have been at odds for far too long. Stop the bagel wars, sign our bagel peace treaty!
  • Really, can you blame them?
  • “How I Stopped Hating Women of the Wall and Started Talking to My Mother.” Will you see it?
  • Taglit-Birthright Israel is redefining who they consider "Jewish" after a 17% drop in registration from 2011-2013. Is the "propaganda tag" keeping young people away?
  • Happy birthday William Shakespeare! Turns out, the Bard knew quite a bit about Jews.
  • Would you get to know racists on a first-name basis if you thought it might help you prevent them from going on rampages, like the recent shooting in Kansas City?
  • "You wouldn’t send someone for a math test without teaching them math." Why is sex ed still so taboo among religious Jews?
  • Russia's playing the "Jew card"...again.
  • "Israel should deal with this discrimination against Americans on its own merits... not simply as a bargaining chip for easy entry to the U.S." Do you agree?
  • For Moroccan Jews, the end of Passover means Mimouna. Terbhou ou Tse'dou! (good luck) How do you celebrate?
  • Calling all Marx Brothers fans!
  • What's it like to run the Palestine International Marathon as a Jew?
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.