Obama and Romney Line Up Lawyers for Close Race

Just in Case, Robert Bauer and Benjamin Ginsberg Are Ready

Ready To Roll Ex-White House counsel Robert Bauer is ready to lead Democratic legal efforts around the presidential election. Benjamin Ginsberg will do the same for the GOP.
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Ready To Roll Ex-White House counsel Robert Bauer is ready to lead Democratic legal efforts around the presidential election. Benjamin Ginsberg will do the same for the GOP.

By Reuters

Published October 27, 2012.

(page 2 of 4)

For decades, Ginsberg and Bauer have given partisan legal advice for campaigns, recounts and election court battles.

“The truth is, there are very few lawyers who work in this area,” Ginsberg told The New York Times in 2004.

Bauer has shown he is willing to enter the political fray.

This summer, he crossed swords with Republican strategist Karl Rove, claiming that American Crossroads, a conservative advocacy group co-founded by the former Bush adviser, was illegally colluding with Romney’s campaign.

Under the U.S. tax code the non-profit arm of American Crossroads, known as Crossroads GPS, can raise and spend unlimited funds as a “social welfare” organization without disclosing its donors, as long as it advocates for positions on issues and does not directly support a candidate.

In June, Rove told Fox News the Crossroads group was not doing anything illegal and Bauer’s criticism was “not going to change us in one way, shape or form from doing exactly what we’re entitled to do under the law.”

CHAOS AHEAD?

With Obama and Romney in a virtual dead heat in the polls, the state-by-state race for president has a range of chaotic possibilities.

The mostly likely scenario is that there will be a clear winner on election night, or the next morning. But the closeness of the race raises the possibility of a range of less conclusive, more confusing scenarios.

Among them: a disputed result in a state because of voting delays, problems with ballots or vote counting.

A contested election would send Bauer and Ginsberg - and law firms across the nation - rushing to courtrooms to question the validity of votes or any other irregularities that might have tipped the scales in a state’s voting results.



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