Noah Pozner's Twin Sister Draws Smile Amid Grief

After Vigil, Jewish Girl Hands Obama Picture of Mom Smiling

Frown to Smile: President Obama arrives at vigil for Newtown victims. Little Arielle Pozner later gave him a drawing of her mother smiling.
getty images
Frown to Smile: President Obama arrives at vigil for Newtown victims. Little Arielle Pozner later gave him a drawing of her mother smiling.

By Forward Staff

Published December 18, 2012.

Amid the crushing grief of the Newtown school rampage, little Arielle Pozner provided a smile for the entire nation.

Twin Left Behind: Arielle Pozner lost her twin brother, Noah, in the Newtown school rampage.
facebook
Twin Left Behind: Arielle Pozner lost her twin brother, Noah, in the Newtown school rampage.

The twin sister of Noah Pozner, the Jewish boy slain in the massacre, drew a picture of their heartbroken mother with a smile on her face, the Algemeiner reported.

The 6-year-old girl, who lost her “best friend” in the senseless violence, handed the picture to President Obama after he spoke at the vigil for the victims on Sunday night.

“Obama was very kind. He thanked her and put the picture in his pocket,” Rabbi Sholom Deitsch of Chabad of Ridgefield, Conn. told The Algemeiner. “The President coming to share in their sorrow and share in their grief was really important to the family.”

Noah was the youngest victim of the rampage that left 28 people dead, including 20 children at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

Arielle and an older sister also attended the school, but were in different classrooms and escaped unharmed.

Noah Pozner was the first to be buried after the attack.

The family, which moved to Connecticut from Brooklyn in search of safety and good schools, is now sitting shiva at home, the rabbi said.

Deitsch told Algemeiner he plans to spend time with the family as they mourn the loss of Noah.

“I want to just be there on a personal level, not just to be there to answer their questions, but to be there as a friend, as a person, as a human being,” he said. “That’s what’s needed the most right now, to feel that they’re not alone.”



Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.