Strauss-Kahn Must Face Pimp Case in France

Ex-IMF Chief's Legal Woes Not Done Yet

getty images

By Reuters

Published December 19, 2012.
  • Print
  • Share Share
  • Multi Page

A French court on Wednesday rejected a request by former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn to drop a sex offence inquiry in which he risks standing trial on pimping charges, his lawyers said.

The ruling was given just over a week after Strauss-Kahn settled a separate civil case in New York with a hotel maid who accused him of attempted rape in May 2011, ending his French presidential hopes and career at the International Monetary Fund.

While the New York settlement brought his U.S. legal woes to an end, the latest decision by the court in Douai in northern France means he remains under the legal spotlight at home.

“Dominique Strauss-Kahn’s defence team is certain that he will ultimately be cleared of these absurd accusations of pimping,” lawyer Henri Leclerc said in a statement, adding that he planned to appeal to France’s supreme court.

Strauss-Kahn denies wrongdoing in all the charges against him.

He is under fire about sex parties with prostitutes in the so-called Carlton Affair, named after a hotel in northern France at the centre of the inquiry.

His lawyers argue that consorting with prostitutes is not illegal and that investigators have no grounds for pursuing him on the basis that his behaviour could be construed as pimping, which is illegal.

They denounced “serious violations” of their defendant’s rights, alleging that investigators held back information which should have been shared with lawyers.

Several acquaintances of Strauss-Kahn, or “DSK” as he is often called in France, are under inquiry too, including a police commissioner, Jean-Christophe Lagarde.

Lagarde’s lawyer, Olivier Bluche, said he might take the matter to the European Court of Human rights.

Under French law, being placed under official investigation does not automatically lead to trial but it often takes months or years before a decision to take the matter to court or not.

In the United States, Strauss-Kahn’s legal troubles ended within 18 months of a sex assault complaint filed by New York Sofitel hotel maid Nafissatou Diallo.

U.S. prosecutors dropped criminal charges in August 2011, saying they had worries about Guinea-born Diallo’s credibility as a witness in court after discovering that she had lied in the past on tax and immigration documents.

She opened civil proceedings that ended last week with a settlement for an undisclosed sum, but Strauss-Kahn’s problems multiplied in France while U.S. proceedings ran their course.

Firstly, a woman writer accused him of a sex assault many years earlier in a case prosecutors declined to pursue because no complaint was filed at the time of the incident.

His name then started cropping up in the Carlton affair, where a group rape charge was dropped earlier this year after a woman withdrew her complaint.

Strauss-Kahn, who is now living separately from wife Anne Sinclair, a wealthy art heiress who has revived her career as a journalist since the couple returned to France in late 2011, recently set up a one-man business consultancy.


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • When is a legume not necessarily a legume? Philologos has the answer.
  • "Sometime in my childhood, I realized that the Exodus wasn’t as remote or as faceless as I thought it was, because I knew a former slave. His name was Hersh Nemes, and he was my grandfather." Share this moving Passover essay!
  • Getting ready for Seder? Chag Sameach! http://jd.fo/q3LO2
  • "We are not so far removed from the tragedies of the past, and as Jews sit down to the Seder meal, this event is a teachable moment of how the hatred of Jews-as-Other is still alive and well. It is not realistic to be complacent."
  • Aperitif Cocktail, Tequila Shot, Tom Collins or Vodka Soda — Which son do you relate to?
  • Elvis craved bacon on tour. Michael Jackson craved matzo ball soup. We've got the recipe.
  • This is the face of hatred.
  • What could be wrong with a bunch of guys kicking back with a steak and a couple of beers and talking about the Seder? Try everything. #ManSeder
  • BREAKING: Smirking killer singled out Jews for death in suburban Kansas City rampage. 3 die in bloody rampage at JCC and retirement home.
  • Real exodus? For Mimi Minsky, it's screaming kids and demanding hubby on way down to Miami, not matzo in the desert.
  • The real heroines of Passover prep aren't even Jewish. But the holiday couldn't happen without them.
  • Is Handel’s ‘Messiah’ an anti-Semitic screed?
  • Meet the Master of the Matzo Ball.
  • Pierre Dulaine wants to do in his hometown of Jaffa what he did for kids in Manhattan: teach them to dance.
  • "The first time I met Mick Jagger, I said, 'Those are the tackiest shoes I’ve ever seen.'” Jewish music journalist Lisa Robinson remembers the glory days of rock in her new book, "There Goes Gravity."
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.