Yeshiva Officials, Rabbis Knew of Alleged Abuse

More Students Say Nothing Was Done About Allegations


By Paul Berger

Published December 20, 2012, issue of December 28, 2012.

(page 7 of 9)

The man told him to stop. “After he got off of me, [Finkelstein] proceeded to rail at me that he was very disappointed in me,” the man said. “I noticed that he was indeed quite aroused, and [I] was nauseated by it.”

The man, who came from a troubled family and who had seen Finkelstein as a father figure, said he was devastated. “I could not believe that this is what he believed our relationship was all about,” he said.

The man said that in 1995 one of his coworkers, another Y.U. high school graduate, contacted him to say that people were “speaking out against George” and asked if he had any bad experiences to report.

“I am embarrassed that I did not step up then, and I’ve not spoken with this individual regarding George since,” the man said. “I think at that time I was either embarrassed or in denial. I can’t say for sure. But it haunts me.”

The Forward asked Y.U. if a complaint against Finkelstein had been made in 1995. A spokesman said, “As mentioned before, Y.U. is looking into the allegations you’ve reported on, and as such we are not in a position to comment any further.”

In 2000, former student Twersky said he approached Michael Broyde, a Modern Orthodox rabbi who had just left a position at Beth Din of America, the official religious court of the RCA. Twersky asked if he should bring charges against Finkelstein in the beit din, and said that Broyde advised him that the allegations were “not flagrant enough.”

Broyde said he does not recall the exchange with Twersky “in any way, shape or form.”

“I don’t even know who Mordechai Twersky is,” Broyde said. “If he said he was sexually assaulted, I would have said to call the police.”

Twersky said Broyde ought to remember him; they were in the same constitutional law class at Yeshiva College in 1983. During the late 1990s, Beth Din of America retained Twersky for public relations work that involved “working closely with Broyde on the marketing materials for their newly established rabbinic court,” Twersky said.



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