The Wisdom of Solomonov

Citron and Rose Remakes Kosher Ashkenazi Fare

Cholent Redux: At Citron and Rose, chefs Michael Solomonov and Yehuda Sichel, create elegant interpretations of Ashkenazi dishes like sholet, a Hungarian cholent. Here, it’s made with lamb shank, beans and kishke.
Steve Legato
Cholent Redux: At Citron and Rose, chefs Michael Solomonov and Yehuda Sichel, create elegant interpretations of Ashkenazi dishes like sholet, a Hungarian cholent. Here, it’s made with lamb shank, beans and kishke.

By Adeena Sussman

Published January 16, 2013, issue of January 25, 2013.
  • Print
  • Share Share
  • Single Page

Michael Solomonov didn’t exactly need a kosher restaurant in his portfolio. The Philadelphia chef already claimed an impressive string of successes, starting with Zahav, the Israeli-inspired restaurant he opened to great acclaim in 2008. Zahav begat Federal Donuts — which also sells fetish-worthy fried chicken — and Percy Street Barbecue, whose other-white-meat offerings might send a Jewish mother to shul to pray for the chef’s salvation.

And yet, a recent evening found the winner of a prestigious 2011 James Beard Award at the blonde-wood bar of his new kosher restaurant, Citron and Rose. Based on appearances, the space, decorated with rich-patterned fabrics accented with turquoise metallic flourishes, could compete with its downtown rivals. Bartenders mixed cocktails such as the Reb Roy (an admittedly tasty blend of Manischewitz and bourbon) and poured craft beers into glasses as patrons began to file in.

But Citron and Rose is not downtown. Rather, it is located in the Main Line hamlet of Bala Cynwyd, a prosperous and heavily Orthodox suburb 15 minutes from the seat of his downtown restaurant empire. “Would you like a soy latte?” Solomonov asked me as he pulled a chair up to the bar, which has an unfettered view of the open kitchen beyond. “I can definitely guarantee it’ll definitely be soy.”

The restaurant’s mashgiach, or kosher supervisor, black yarmulke crowning his head, stood at the back of the spacious kitchen. Words like “schmaltz” and “kishke” wafted through the air. There was nary a pat of butter or cream in sight (hence that soy-laced coffee). So what gave? Had Solomonov found religion?

The 34-year-old chef, who was born in Israel but raised in Pittsburgh, says no, and even a cursory glance at the menu, with dishes like chopped liver lollipops lavished with cherries, cocoa and rye, reveals that the food bears only a passing resemblance to your bubbe’s Shabbos table — not to mention the menus of many of the country’s most expensive kosher eateries. There are no maki rolls here. “Steak and sushi is mostly what you see in high-end kosher these days,” Solomonov said. “We may be able to feed all Jews because we’re kosher, but we’re not trying to please all the people all the time.”

Similar to restaurateurs like Noah Bernamoff at Brooklyn’s Mile End, Solomonov is reviving long-standing Jewish traditions like pickling vegetables, curing fish and making charcuterie, methods that Ashkenazim before them had perfected generations, even centuries, earlier. But he’s also applying the classical training he learned both at the New England Culinary Institute and under the tutelage of Philly chef Marc Vetri, and using seasonal produce and quality ingredients, hoping in the process to elevate kosher dining beyond the stigma of captive-audience cuisine.

“I’d been thinking about doing this concept for a while,” said Solomonov, his lean figure clad in jeans and chef’s whites. “We explored and tweaked the Sephardic side of things at Zahav,” he said. “It was time to pay our respects to the Eastern European food a lot of us grew up eating.”

A chance meeting two years ago with Jewish culinary historian Gil Marks at the Hazon Food Conference further sparked the chef’s imagination. Marks and Solomonov discussed the rich and varied history of Eastern European Jewish food. Among other revelations, Marks reported that cassoulet, a French meat-and-bean dish, could trace its origins to cholent; that the inventor of foie gras, Jean-Joseph Clause, received his livers from Alsatian Jews who raised geese, and that many of Europe’s premier pastry chefs were Jewish, since pastry production was a new avocation whose guild had not yet banned Jews from its ranks. “It really opened my eyes,” Solomonov said.

Before the restaurant opened, Solomonov and his business partner Steven Cook took Yehuda Sichel, Citron and Rose’s 26-year-old chef de cuisine, to Budapest and Paris. There the trio feasted on smoked goose, charcuterie, pickled fish and sholet, a cholent derivative that is a national comfort food in Hungary. These and other Jewish-influenced European delicacies became an integral part of Citron and Rose’s menu.

Solomonov decided that rather than viewing kosher guidelines as an obstacle, he would look at them as an opportunity. Unlike other current upscale-kosher contenders such as New York’s Jezebel, where the founding chef has already left and the artwork features ironic paintings with iconic Jewish personalities, Citron and Rose seems to be based less on gimmickry and more on sound culinary principles.


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • "I thought I was the only Jew on a Harley Davidson, but I was wrong." — Gil Paul, member of the Hillel's Angels. http://jd.fo/g4cjH
  • “This is a dangerous region, even for people who don’t live there and say, merely express the mildest of concern about the humanitarian tragedy of civilians who have nothing to do with the warring factions, only to catch a rash of *** (bleeped) from everyone who went to your bar mitzvah! Statute of limitations! Look, a $50 savings bond does not buy you a lifetime of criticism.”
  • That sound you hear? That's your childhood going up in smoke.
  • "My husband has been offered a terrific new job in a decent-sized Midwestern city. This is mostly great, except for the fact that we will have to leave our beloved NYC, where one can feel Jewish without trying very hard. He is half-Jewish and was raised with a fair amount of Judaism and respect for our tradition though ultimately he doesn’t feel Jewish in that Larry David sort of way like I do. So, he thinks I am nuts for hesitating to move to this new essentially Jew-less city. Oh, did I mention I am pregnant? Seesaw, this concern of mine is real, right? There is something to being surrounded by Jews, no? What should we do?"
  • "Orwell described the cliches of politics as 'packets of aspirin ready at the elbow.' Israel's 'right to defense' is a harder narcotic."
  • From Gene Simmons to Pink — Meet the Jews who rock:
  • The images, which have since been deleted, were captioned: “Israel is the last frontier of the free world."
  • As J Street backs Israel's operation in Gaza, does it risk losing grassroots support?
  • What Thomas Aquinas might say about #Hamas' tunnels:
  • The Jewish bachelorette has spoken.
  • "When it comes to Brenda Turtle, I ask you: What do you expect of a woman repressed all her life who suddenly finds herself free to explore? We can sit and pass judgment, especially when many of us just simply “got over” own sexual repression. But we are obliged to at least acknowledge that this problem is very, very real, and that complete gender segregation breeds sexual repression and unhealthy attitudes toward female sexuality."
  • "Everybody is proud of the resistance. No matter how many people, including myself, disapprove of or even hate Hamas and its ideology, every single person in Gaza is proud of the resistance." Part 2 of Walid Abuzaid's on-the-ground account of life in #Gaza:
  • After years in storage, Toronto’s iconic red-and-white "Sam the Record Man" sign, complete with spinning discs, will return to public view near its original downtown perch. The sign came to symbolize one of Canada’s most storied and successful Jewish family businesses.
  • Is $4,000 too much to ask for a non-member to be buried in a synagogue cemetery?
  • "Let’s not fall into the simplistic us/them dichotomy of 'we were just minding our business when they started firing rockets at us.' We were not just minding our business. We were building settlements, manning checkpoints, and filling jails." What do you think?
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.