The Fast-Shifting Map of Jewish New York

Population Dips in Old Strongholds, Explodes in New Ones

Shifts and Surprises: A new study pinpoints where New York’s Jewish population is growing fast and where its stagnant or shrinking. There are some big surprises.
claudio papapietro
Shifts and Surprises: A new study pinpoints where New York’s Jewish population is growing fast and where its stagnant or shrinking. There are some big surprises.

By Josh Nathan-Kazis

Published January 18, 2013.

(page 3 of 3)

The Jewish community in Washington Heights and Inwood in far northern Manhattan has grown 144% over the past decade, by far the fastest growing neighborhood in the study. The community there is still small – just 12,900 Jewish households. Still, it’s young and heavily Orthodox, and poised to continue to grow.

“We’re catching it as it’s really blooming from a Jewish population point of view,” said Cohen. “The West Side has priced them out of the market.”

As Orthodox identification grows, identification with the Reform and Conservative movements is shrinking across the area. That’s most visible in places like the Upper West Side, where the percentage of people identifying as Conservative dropped from 25% to 20% between 2011 and.

Not all areas have seen comparable decreases. In Queens and Nassau County, for instance, the proportion of Jews identifying as Conservative has been more stable.

“Our hypothesis is that people live more traditional lives in the suburban communities, and that’s one dimension of their traditional life,” Beck said.



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