Israel's Other Impending Election

David Stav Offers Illusion of Pluralism in Chief Rabbi Fight

By Uri Regev

Published January 21, 2013, issue of January 25, 2013.

(page 2 of 2)

In Israel, Stav announced that if Tzohar rabbis were not granted this authority — “the damage to the Jewish People would be indescribable…. Israeli Jews will [choose Reform or civil marriage in Cyprus], pushing them [and all their descendents] out of the Jewish people… causing apostasy and a split.”

Stav’s campaign presents a disturbing fallacy, suggesting that should religious freedom be realized and civil marriage be allowed legally, the Jewish people would split into two peoples. Yet, the American experience, with all its imperfections, proves that the opposite is true. No leader in the Jewish community should accept the misguided notion that the only way to maintain Jewish unity is by acquiescing to Orthodox rabbinic authority.

This past December, Tzohar rabbis publicly disassociated themselves from a statement made by one of their founders, Rabbi Yuval Cherlow, following his visit to the United States. In it, Cherlow called for re-evaluation of the battle waged against Reform Judaism.

Tzohar rabbis reacted with a strong statement expressing their opposition to any recognition by the State of Israel of Reform Judaism and its rabbis. This reaction echoes earlier attacks by Stav and Tzohar rabbis on the Supreme Court for ruling in favor of recognizing non-Orthodox conversions, which he labeled “fictitious,” while they openly supported the notorious Rotem conversion bill.

As misguided and contrary to pluralistic principles as their views may be, Amar and Stav are entitled to their opinions. At the same time, no one should be under the illusion that somehow replacing one rigid ultra-Orthodox rabbi by a more benign and smiling Modern Orthodox candidate is a desirable solution to the challenge of religion/state in Israel.

Both candidates, as well as the others whose names have come up for the post, hold the view that Israel should exercise religious coercion and deny both non-Orthodox and secular Jews their freedom of and from religion. Instead, what Israel needs is to fully realize its founding promise for “freedom of religion and conscience,” as envisioned in Israel’s Declaration of Independence — nothing more and nothing less.

Fortunately there are growing voices from within the Modern Orthodox community that embrace this conclusion. Celebrating religious freedom will make Israel both more democratic and more Jewish. Perpetuating a coercive Chief Rabbinate, even if guised by a smile, achieves the exact opposite.

Uri Regev is the head of Hiddush — Freedom of Religion for Israel, a nonpartisan and nondenominational Israel-Diaspora partnership for religious freedom and equality.



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