Rome Holocaust Museum Delayed by Red Tape

Planned for Ancient Palazzo That Was Mussolini's Residence

Black Box: The Museo Nazionale della Shoah will be inscribed with names of victims.
MUSEO NAZIONALE DELLA SHOAH
Black Box: The Museo Nazionale della Shoah will be inscribed with names of victims.

By JTA

Published January 28, 2013.
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“It is surely one of the ironies of history that for nearly two decades Mussolini resided on top of a catacomb complex constructed by those whose descendants – being the main victims of his racial policies – were the ones he forcefully tried to eliminate from the very fabric of Italian society,” Leonard Rutgers, a Dutch expert on the catacombs, told JTA.

The museum, which will cover 25,000 square feet, was designed by the architects Luca Zevi and Giorgio Tamburini. Zevi, whose mother, Tullia, served for years as head of the Italian Jewish community, has described the design as a “black box” – a huge flattened cube that will bear the names of Italian Holocaust victims. Inside will be a permanent exhibit as well as an archive, library, conference hall and facilities for research and education.

Plans for the museum’s exhibition and research facilities are being overseen by a committee headed by Marcello Pezzetti, one of Italy’s leading Holocaust scholars and educators, who will also serve as the museum director. Pezzetti has said he wants the museum to “insert the Holocaust in the Italian context into the Holocaust in the European context: By the time that the first Italian Jews were deported from Rome in October 1943, three-quarters of East European Jews had already been killed.”

Among the main focus areas, Paserman has said, will be a confrontation with Italy’s “uneasy” history as a fascist ally of Nazi Germany at the onset of World War II, as well as the ambiguous role of the Catholic Church before and during the Shoah.

“Almost 70 years have passed since the Shoah, and the survivors – the witnesses – are passing away,” Paserman said. “After 70 years, we are passing from memory to history, and this museum will be a place to learn history, to train teachers, to educate new generations.”

Holocaust education is already a fixture of the Italian school system, with classes and courses as well as special events marking International Holocaust Memorial Day, Jan. 27. Each year, hundreds of Italian students are taken to Auschwitz on educational trips.

Even with no further delays, Paserman told JTA, the new museum will still not open until 2016 or 2017. Construction alone, he said, would take more than two years. Further complicating matters is the fact that while the city is footing the $30 million bill for the museum’s construction, funds still must be found for the exhibition.

“We are all hit by the financial crisis,” Paserman said. “But there is great will to get the museum built on the part of the authorities.”


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