Heartless Thieves Steal Torah Scrolls From Bronx Synagogue

My Childhood Shul Was Already Struggling as Jews Move

Shul Days: Young Israel of Mosholu Parkway was once a thriving, crowded synagogue. Its congregation has dwindled — and now thieves have snatched its prized Torah scrolls.
Shul Days: Young Israel of Mosholu Parkway was once a thriving, crowded synagogue. Its congregation has dwindled — and now thieves have snatched its prized Torah scrolls.

By Rukhl Schaechter

Published February 14, 2013.

(page 2 of 2)

Although it still isn’t clear how the thief entered the synagogue, it probably wasn’t too difficult, since the building is usually empty these days. A small minyan meets there only on Shabbos, with the help of several resident physicians at nearby Montefiore Hospital.

The synagogue is also achingly in need of repairs, including several holes in the roof.

Forty years ago, when the neighborhood was predominantly Jewish, the Young Israel of Mosholu Parkway (or “Moyshele’s Parkway”, as we called it), attracted hundreds of worshippers during the High Holy Days, and dozens every shabbos. The building, which was erected in 1957, seemed so modern and inviting.

There was also a thriving Talmud Torah for public school children atended by over 100 boys and about 35 girls, Charlop said. “The boys’ classes were five days a week, and the girls’ classes were three days a week. Sometimes, girls even asked if they could come to class for five days. In those cases, we let them sit in on the boys’ classes.”

On Rosh Hashona and Yom Kippur, the place was packed. Services were conducted both in the spacious main sanctuary and the social hall in the basement. “1977 was our best year,” Charlop recalled. “We sold 775 seats. We even had to add folding chairs to the stage in the social hall to accommodate everyone. But after ‘77, it all went downhill.”

In the late 1970s, many Jewish families fled the Bronx for the suburbs, fearing the disintegration of the borough due to rising racial conflicts. Despite the difficulties that the synagogue has experienced since then, its spiritual leader hasn’t given up. Every shabbos, after services, he invites the worshippers to his house for lunch, prepared by his daughters. Usually, seven or eight people come over.

“When my daughters come for shabbos, they bring their husbands, too,” Charlop said. “That gives us two more men for a minyan.”



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