Oscars Host Seth MacFarlane Crossed Line To Bigotry and Anti-Semitism

Talking Bear Skit Was Offensive — and Not Funny, Either

Not Too Funny: Oscars host Seth MacFarlane made jokes about gays, women, Latinas and Jews. Just because he was an equal opportunity offender doesn’t make it any less, well, offensive. Plus, he wasn’t too funny.
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Not Too Funny: Oscars host Seth MacFarlane made jokes about gays, women, Latinas and Jews. Just because he was an equal opportunity offender doesn’t make it any less, well, offensive. Plus, he wasn’t too funny.

By Peter Dreier

Published February 25, 2013.

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Perhaps the most offensive comments were made by “Ted,” the talking stuffed bear who bantered (through MacFarlane’s voice) with actor Mark Wahlberg about Hollywood’s domination by Jews. If putting those words in the mouth of a talking bear is supposed to make the remarks cute and cuddly, it didn’t work with me.

The set-up was Ted’s desire to gain acceptance with the Hollywood “in” crowd, which he said were the Jews, so he could attend a post-Oscars orgy. Ted begged Wahlberg to tell him where the orgy would be held. Wahlberg finally spilled the beans – it would be “at Jack Nicholson’s house.”

It was a not very subtle – and not very funny – reference to a 1977 incident that occurred at Nicholson’s home, where director Roman Polanski raped a 13-year-old girl. Polanski pleaded guilty but fled to Paris before he was sentenced.

Remarking on all the talent assembled at the ceremony, Ted said to Wahlberg, “You know what’s interesting? All those actors I just named are part Jewish,” referring to Joaquin Phoenix (who has a Jewish mother), Daniel Day-Lewis (ditto) and Alan Arkin (both parents were Jewish).

“What about you?” Ted asked Wahlberg. “You’ve got a ‘berg’ on the end of your name. Are you Jewish?”

Wahlberg explained that he is Catholic. Ted responded: “Wrong answer. Try again. Do you want to work in this town or don’t you?”

To gain favor with the Hollywood crowd, Ted claimed that he was Jewish, that he “was born Theodore Shapiro,” and that “I would like to donate money to Israel and continue to work in Hollywood forever.”

When Wahlberg called Ted an idiot, Ted responded, “We’ll see who’s an idiot when they give me my private plane at the next secret synagogue meeting.”

Ted’s (or, in reality, MacFarlane’s) remarks about the “secret” Jewish cabal that controls Hollywood, discriminates against non-Jews and is tied to Israel were not clever and witty. They were anti-Semitic.

I’m certain that many film industry folks sitting in the audience were uncomfortable with the barrage of offensive comments throughout the evening. I’m not a prude and I believe it’s OK to make fun of one’s foibles. But the comments by McFarlane and Ted comments did not simply poke fun at specific individuals; they targeted entire groups.

Sunday night’s Oscars show crossed the invisible line between satire and bigotry. It was ugly and unfunny.

As a progressive and a Jew, I found the comments outrageous, and I’m confident that many of the millions of Americans watching the show on TV also were offended by the bigoted stereotypes about women, gays, Latinas and Jews.

Of course, there were no hooded sheets, burning crosses, N words, or “fag” jokes. But bigotry comes in various shades.

This piece was first published by the Jewish Telegraphic Agency (JTA)

Peter Dreier teaches politics and chairs the Urban & Environmental Policy department at Occidental College. His most recent book is “The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century: A Social Justice Hall of Fame” (Nation Books, 2012).



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