Palestine Might Still Be A Better Name Than Israel

Why The Naming of Countries Can Be a Difficult Matter

The Value of Names: What should “Eretz Israel” be called in English? What it’s always been called, at least for the past several hundred years — namely, Palestine.
Getty Images
The Value of Names: What should “Eretz Israel” be called in English? What it’s always been called, at least for the past several hundred years — namely, Palestine.

By Philologos

Published March 17, 2013, issue of March 22, 2013.

(page 2 of 2)

Which isn’t to say that “Eretz-Israel” should be used in English. On the contrary, I’m all for avoiding it. It’s a clumsy hybrid — eretz is not an English word, and Israel is not a Hebrew one — with propagandistic overtones. Zionist writers and publicists who wished to avoid saying “Palestine ” introduced it into English in the first half of the 20th century, and it continues to be used, when it is, by Zionists and pro-Zionists only.

Nor is the totally English “Land of Israel” much of an improvement. Both terms are misguided ways of declaring, “Palestine is a Jewish country and should be called by its Jewish name” — misguided because, while there’s nothing wrong with such a sentiment, Jewish sentiments shouldn’t be forced on the English language.

So what should “Eretz Israel” be called in English? It should be called what it’s always been called, at least for the past several hundred years — namely, Palestine. As I’ve argued before in these pages, “Palestine” was never traditionally an anti-Jewish or anti-Zionist word and shouldn’t be allowed to become one. Until the declaration of the State of Israel, in 1948, in fact, Zionists used it all the time, and Palestinian Jews proudly called themselves “Palestinians.”

True, times have changed. Yet linguistic needs haven’t. We still need a linguistically neutral term for “the area between the Mediterranean and the Jordan River,” and it would be wiser to insist on restoring the traditional neutrality of “Palestine” than to try to come up with an artificial and unnatural-sounding substitute.

Of course, matters will be complicated further if there should be an Arab state called Palestine in part of the geographical area called Palestine. But there’s no reason that one can’t distinguish between the state of Palestine and the land of Palestine, just as one distinguishes in Hebrew between medinat yisra’el, “the state of Israel,” and eretz-yisra’el, “the land of Israel.”

If a state of Palestine is established, the cities of Nablus, Ramallah, Jericho and Hebron will not be in medinat yisra’el, yet they will continue to be in eretz-yisra’el; nor is there any conceivable way in the Hebrew language that they could not be. If Roger Cohen understood this, he would understand something about historical Jewish attitudes toward Palestine that eludes him: Zionism did not rediscover the “Land of Israel.” It was there all the time.

Questions for Philologos can be sent to philologos@forward.com



Would you like to receive updates about new stories?






















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.