Supreme Court May Seek To Avoid Sweeping Ruling on Gay Marriage

Questions Suggest a Narrow Focus — Not Wide Constutionality

Yes and No: Protesters on both sides fo the gay marriage issue rallied outside the Supreme Court in Washington.
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Yes and No: Protesters on both sides fo the gay marriage issue rallied outside the Supreme Court in Washington.

By Reuters

Published March 26, 2013.

(page 2 of 3)

Yet the justices do not seem ready for a role on centerstage in the matter. Justice Sonia Sotomayor, a liberal, questioned whether the issue should percolate a little longer in the states. Justice Samuel Alito, a conservative, asserted that the notion of same-sex marriage was newer than today’s ubiquitous cellphones and perhaps not ready for judicial intervention. And Justice Anthony Kennedy, the usual swing vote, likened the court’s possible journey in the case to going into “uncharted waters” or even over “a cliff.”

If the court avoids the looming question about a fundamental right, it could disappoint the two main lawyers pushing for same-sex marriage - Theodore Olson, who argued Tuesday, and David Boies, the legal partner who sat at his side. Yet, it would also mean that the worst-case scenario envisioned by other gay rights supporters would be avoided, too.

Their concern was certainly understandable. The Supreme Court’s past cases on gay rights in narrower contexts, in 1996 and 2003, were vigorously fought. Four of the current nine justices are new to the gay rights issue. The bench is not as predictable as in the past, and overall, because Alito replaced Sandra Day O’Connor in 2006, the court may be more conservative on social policy.

So in May 2009, when Olson and Boies, former opponents from the 2000 presidential election case of Bush v. Gore, suddenly filed their challenge to Proposition 8, many gay rights activists and leaders expressed concern. Advocates who had been concentrating their efforts in the states worried that a federal case could backfire with a decision upholding Proposition 8 and declaring no constitutional right to same-sex marriage.

But that outcome now seems unlikely. While Supreme Court justices sometimes reverse course from the tone of arguments, it seems no major constitutional ruling will emerge from the California case of Hollingsworth v. Perry.

Justices on the right and left questioned whether proponents of Proposition 8, who took up its defense after California officials declined, have legal standing.

“Have we ever granted standing to proponents of ballot initiatives?” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg asked lawyer Charles Cooper, representing Proposition 8 supporters. Cooper said no but stressed that California’s Supreme Court had ruled that under state law the backers of Proposition 8 should be allowed to defend it.



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