For Anthony Lewis, Saving Lives Was Part of Getting the Story

Inspirational Journalism Rare in Age of the Tweet and Blog

Anthony Lewis was an icon of journalism who still believed in the value of a complete story. He knew the power of the written word to save lives, from the Balkans to the Middle East to right here at home.
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Anthony Lewis was an icon of journalism who still believed in the value of a complete story. He knew the power of the written word to save lives, from the Balkans to the Middle East to right here at home.

By David Rohde

Published March 29, 2013.
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At 10:00am on Monday morning, I read on Twitter that Anthony Lewis, the revered New York Times legal writer and columnist, had died at age 85. A few minutes later, I sent out a Tweet calling him “a giant of journalism who saved Gideon & Bosnia.”

The Bosnia reference was personal. Along with writing searing columns that pressured the Clinton administration to intervene in the conflict, Lewis put my family in touch with senior White House officials when I was arrested by Serb forces for ten days while covering the war.

My uncle, Sig Roos, a Boston-based lawyer and one of legions of Lewis admirers, emailed me to mourn his passing and again praise his help. After I was released, I returned to the United States and thanked Lewis in person. He was an extraordinarily kind, gracious and unassuming man, who mentored countless young journalist as tribute after tribute has described this week.

To be honest, as soon as I sent my Tweet about Lewis I regretted it. A man whose work had inspired a generation of reporters, lawyers and judges - and helped save my life - was reduced to 48 characters.

Tweeting about Lewis seemed somehow an indictment of contemporary journalism. Shouldn’t I have taken a few minutes to reflect on Lewis and the extraordinary life he had lived? Why, in the greater scheme of things, did my opinion of him even matter? Worst of all, it was slapdash. In a rushed effort to pay respect to one of the most precise writers of our time, I used the wrong word. Lewis “championed” Gideon and Bosnia. He did not “save” them.

In a moving piece in The Atlantic, Andrew Cohen explained how Lewis’ Supreme Court coverage and seminal book, Gideon’s Trumpet, transformed legal journalism. Lewis’ simple sentences and lucid prose, Cohen wrote, turned arcane legal jargon and court procedures into concepts readers could easily understand. As shown in the passage below, Lewis made justice simple.

The case of Gideon v. Wainwright is in part a testament to a single human being. Against all the odds of inertia and ignorance and fear of state power, Clarence Earl Gideon insisted that he had a right to a lawyer and kept on insisting all the way to the Supreme Court of the United States.


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