Miliband vs. Miliband Feud Ends as One British Jewish Brother Comes to New York

David Miliband Leaves Ed Behind To Run for Prime Minister

All in the Family: David Miliband is quitting politics and moving to New York, leaving his brother, Ed, to run for prime minister.
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All in the Family: David Miliband is quitting politics and moving to New York, leaving his brother, Ed, to run for prime minister.

By J.J. Goldberg

Published April 05, 2013, issue of April 12, 2013.
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David, the elder brother, entered politics in his 20s as a wunderkind protégé of Tony Blair. More conservative than his father, he was a key author of Blair’s centrist 1997 New Labour platform, which echoed Bill Clinton’s New Democrats program. By the time Blair retired in 2007, David was his environment minister and presumed heir to his legacy. That made him a threat to Blair’s successor and longtime party rival, left-leaning finance minister Gordon Brown.

Instead of challenging Brown, David signed on as foreign minister in a show of party unity. Ed, four years younger and a Brown protégé, joined the cabinet in a junior post. British media gushed over the novelty of sibling ministers serving together, only the second such pair since medieval times. Ed was promoted the following year to energy and climate minister, David’s old turf. Despite their ties to rival party factions, the brothers were considered close. David was known as brainy and reserved, Ed as garrulous and charismatic.

In May 2010 Brown led Labour into elections and lost. He promptly resigned as party leader. A week later David declared his candidacy for leadership. Ed announced his upstart leftist candidacy two days later. Eventually a five-way race emerged. Both brothers insisted the competition wouldn’t affect family relations. The only clear sign of strain was from their mother, who reportedly told friends she wished they’d entered academia like their parents.

When the primaries were over, Ed had won by a whisker, bolstered by union and left-wing votes. This only heightened the drama. Ed asked David to join his leadership team. David declined. Publicly, David said he didn’t want to undermine Ed by inviting speculation about continuing rivalry. Privately, associates said Ed felt hurt by David’s rejection, while David reportedly viewed Ed’s inner circle as lightweights.

For two and a half years David sat quietly in parliament, dabbling in teaching and volunteering on the side, turning down job offers. Finally, when the International Rescue Committee called, he jumped.

Whatever else the rivalry might have done, it appears to have intensified the brothers’ public identification as Jews. After the vote, Ed gave a rare interview to the weekly Jewish Chronicle, saying there was “a set of values my parents taught me about justice and making the world a better place, which are recognisably ‘left’ values but also owe something to the Jewish tradition.” Ed’s sons are named Daniel and Samuel. David’s are Isaac and Jacob.

In 2011 Ed married his longtime partner in a civil ceremony at which he ceremonially broke a glass. In May 2012, in his most public gesture yet, he wrote a personal essay for a special issue on British Jewish identity in the left-leaning monthly New Statesman. He described an uneasy mixture of attachment to and distance from the Jewish past, proclaimed his love of Yiddish slang and Woody Allen films and defiantly asked, “How can my Jewishness not be a part of me?”

As for the reserved David, he may find that New York and his new job force his private identity into the open. The International Rescue Committee, for all its non-sectarian cachet, remains at heart the non-Jewish Jewish institution it was at birth. Most of its leaders over the years have been Jewish; its current board includes, along with A-list diplomats, such luminaries as Elie Wiesel, Jessica (Mrs. Jerry) Seinfeld and two of America’s best-known Jewish labor leaders, retired ladies’ garment chief Jay Mazur and teachers’ union president Randi Weingarten.

Miliband will find he’s been recruited not just as a diplomat, but also as a voice of the next generation of Jewish socialism. While taking on the global future, he’s also reclaiming his past.

Meanwhile, a March 23 poll in The Guardian showed 54% believe Ed will be Britain’s next prime minister.

Contact J.J. Goldberg at goldberg@forward.com


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