Anne Frank's Step-Sister Speaks Out in New Book

Eva Schloss, 83, Says Trauma Continued Through Her Lifetime

Getty Images

By Reuters

Published April 08, 2013.

(page 2 of 2)

The two families had been friends and several years after the war Schloss’s mother married Anne Frank’s father, Otto, whose relentless optimism she cites as a key reason for her ability to cope with the post-war years.

Schloss remained silent for nearly 40 years about her ordeals and it was not until she was invited to an exhibition about Anne Frank in London 1986 and asked about her own life that she started to talk. She never looked back.

She has since spoken at engagements internationally, published two books about the Holocaust, and campaigned in schools and prison to educate people about prejudice and intolerance to continue the legacy of her step-sister.

She was awarded an MBE, a top British honour, in 2012.

With her third book, Schloss said she wanted to focus on the lifetime of suffering faced by survivors after the slaughter of six million Jews by the German Nazis and their collaborators.

She said she was one of the lucky ones because she had managed to build a new life in London where she lives with her husband of 60 years, Zvi, with whom she has three daughters.

“All us survivors are quite elderly and in a few years we won’t be around so we need to tell our stories,” she said.

“Racial tolerance is improving with more mixed marriages but religious tolerance seems to be getting worse with more fanatics now. It is my duty to try to explain and to promote more acceptance and tolerance in the new generations.”



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