Thriller Writer Janice Steinberg Preaches Gospel of Second Chances

'Tin Horse' Tells a Tale of Mistaken Identity

The Mysteries of Steinberg: In “The Tin Horse,” Jewish identity is something that one can never truly escape.
Gaia Steinberg
The Mysteries of Steinberg: In “The Tin Horse,” Jewish identity is something that one can never truly escape.

By Julia M. Klein

Published April 17, 2013, issue of April 19, 2013.
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Along with her success, Steinberg’s protagonist has had her troubles. She never had a smooth, or particularly close, relationship with her immigrant mother, a brilliant card player and frustrated actress. Her relationship with her daughter, Carol, is similarly embattled. Her steadfast husband has died, and two of her three sisters are gone: Audrey was felled by a stroke, and Barbara, Elaine’s fraternal twin, ran away from home when she was in her 20s, never resurfacing to apologize or explain.

Even six decades later, Barbara’s disappearance still gnaws at Elaine, leading her reflections back to Boyle Heights, where the twins grew up together and grew apart. Steinberg’s Boyle Heights is a tight-knit community, with its share of distinctive characters, including Danny Berlov, the immigrant boy who zealously romances both twins. Also memorable is Aunt Pearl — never married, but squired by a married Mexican man; without children of her own, but a second mother to the Greenstein children, and so successful a businesswoman that she provides work for her brother, Elaine’s father.

Boyle Heights is flexible enough to permit Pearl to flourish, and insular enough that as a girl, Elaine, despite growing up with stories of the pogroms, “never experienced scorn or hatred.”

Once she ventures beyond home, however, she sees herself, with a shock, through others’ eyes as ineradicably Jewish. Proudly, she affirms “the integrity… of being utterly myself,” compared with Barbara, whom she views as her “chameleon sister.” But could it be that her vision is blurred?

In “The Tin Horse,” identity — Jewish and otherwise — is something that can be sloughed off but never entirely escaped. It is handed down, like the eponymous tin horse, from father to son, and mother to daughter: put to varying uses, but still recognizable.

Of course, we know that Elaine will go in search of her sister Barbara. And we know that there would be no book if she did not find her. If nothing else, “The Tin Horse” preaches the gospel of second chances, suggesting that where the emotional stakes are high, it is never too late. Though its characters are Jewish, its conundrums are understandable to anyone who knows firsthand just how thoroughly families can both wound and heal.

Julia M. Klein is a cultural reporter and critic in Philadelphia and a contributing editor at Columbia Journalism Review.


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