Rabbi Michael Broyde Tight-Lipped About 'Sockpuppet' Scandal

Won't Talk About Fake Persona at Academic Conference

No Comment: Rabbi Michael Broyde speaks at a conference on Jewish and Islamic law in Chicago. He had little to say about the fake name scandal that has erupted in recent days.
menachem wecker
No Comment: Rabbi Michael Broyde speaks at a conference on Jewish and Islamic law in Chicago. He had little to say about the fake name scandal that has erupted in recent days.

By Menachem Wecker

Published April 16, 2013.

As Michael Broyde paced beside a spread of bagels, lox, and pastries in the back of the room awaiting his turn at the podium, an audience member approached. “We’ve met,” the man said. “I just wanted to wish you well.”

Broyde’s keynote today at the conference “Shari’a and Halakha in America” at the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Chicago-Kent College of Law came three days after The Jewish Channel broke the news that the Emory Law professor and rabbi created a fake name “to gain access to members-only correspondence of a rival rabbinic group and tout his own work.”

Attendees who hadn’t followed the news closely wouldn’t have know a scandal was bubbling. The program identified Broyde as “Former Director and currently Dayan (judge), Beth Din of America,” although the Jewish court has suspended him indefinitely. And Broyde referred to the Beth Din several times in his remarks but didn’t reveal that he was suspended and repeatedly refused to discuss both the suspension and his pseudonym.

“No,” Broyde said, when asked during a question and answer session to comment on his future, if any, with the Beth Din. “I’m sorry. It’s a good question, but I can’t.”

After he finished his keynote on “Suggestions for Shari’a Courts based on the Precedent of the Beth Din of America,” Broyde again declined to speak to the Forward and hurried out of the room.

Earlier that day, Emory had released a statement calling the allegations against Broyde, who is a senior fellow at Emory Law’s Center for the Study of Law and Religion, “concerning.” The university is “reviewing the matter,” according to the statement.

Shlomo Pill, a second-year doctoral student in comparative Jewish and Islamic law at Emory and a student of Broyde’s, was one of the 40 attendees. Pill, whose LinkedIn profile identifies him as Broyde’s research assistant, called the conference a “really interesting, eye-opening experience.”



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