Claims Conference Blames Dead Official for Botched $57M Holocaust Fraud Probe

Current Staff Plead Ignorance About 2001 Whistleblower Letter

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By Paul Berger

Published May 16, 2013, issue of May 31, 2013.

(page 2 of 3)

The fraud eventually came to public light in 2009, when a Claims Conference employee discovered two highly dubious applications within a few weeks. The Claims Conference then hired the law firm Proskauer Rose to investigate further, and a few weeks later contacted the FBI.

Domnitser, the director of two Holocaust funds, worked in the Claims Conference’s New York office at the time of the letter.

Greg Schneider
Greg Schneider

Top Claims Conference officials in New York, executive vice president, Gideon Taylor, former executive vice president Saul Kagan and Greg Schneider, assistant to the executive vice-president, were copied on faxes about the letter sent between New York and Frankfurt.

Taylor and Kagan no longer work for the Claims Conference, but Schneider is today the organization’s executive vice president.

Referring to Schneider, Kessler-Godin said in her prepared statement, “The entire investigation in Germany, directed by Dr. Brozik (who was senior to Greg at the time), was never shared with Greg. The entire investigation that occurred did not include Greg and involved people senior to him.”

Kessler-Godin emphasized: “The only document that Greg received … was the explanation from [Domnitser].” In fact, documents obtained by the Forward reveal that Schneider received two separate faxes about the probe, both of which referenced the anonymous letter and its allegations.

The first fax, on June 21, 2001 was a letter from Domnitser to Brozik in which Domnitser dismissed the claims made against him and against several of his colleagues in the anonymous tipoff. The second fax, on June 28, contained Domnitser’s rebuttal of a detailed chart laying out queries and concerns that a Claims Conference employee in Germany assembled after being asked to look into the letter’s allegations.

The staffer confirmed that the five applications cited in the anonymous letter included false statements and apparently fraudulent documents. The Frankfurt-based staffer expressed serious concerns about Domnitser and several employees who had approved these applications.



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