Move Over Florida, Charleston Is New Hot Place for Jewish Couples

Shavuot Retreat Highlights Strong Jewish Community

Southern Living: Charleston’s Jewish community is one of the oldest Jewish communities in the country and is stronger than most realize.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON LIBRARY
Southern Living: Charleston’s Jewish community is one of the oldest Jewish communities in the country and is stronger than most realize.

By Rukhl Schaechter

Published May 25, 2013.
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This article originally appeared in Yiddish in the Forverts.

The Jewish community of Charleston, South Carolina, wants everyone to know that Florida isn’t the only state where Jewish couples can enjoy their golden years basking in warm weather and Jewish community.

Last week, Charleston’s modern Orthodox synagogue, Brith Sholom Beth Israel, hosted more than 40 Jews from New York, Los Angeles and beyond for a three-day Shavuot retreat. The organizers provided the participants with meals, hotel rooms and a full program including words of Torah, academic lectures and ample opportunity to visit the tourist sites of this charming, historic city.

The event was the brainchild of Ariela Davis, 31, the sprightly wife of Rabbi Moshe Davis, who last August assumed the pulpit of BSBI, as the synagogue calls itself. Noting how many Jewish tourists were stopping by the synagogue all year round, Rebbetzin Davis, as she is known, suggested that they organize a Shavuot program for out-of-towners, in order to allow them to get to know the Jewish community more personally.

Charleston is indeed a major tourist destination. In February, the city was voted “Top City in the United States” for the second consecutive year in the Condé Nast Traveler Reader’s Choice Awards. Nearly 4.5 million tourists visit the city every year. According to the Charleston Area Convention and Visitors Bureau, nearly 4.5 million tourists visit the city every year.

Yet few people are aware that Charleston boasts an active Jewish community, including three Orthodox congregations, a Conservative synagogue and Reform temple, a day school, a JCC and a growing Jewish studies department at the College of Charleston, where classes are open to the public.

“Lots of people looking to retire fly right over us to Florida,” remarked Larry Haber, the president of BSBI. “We did this [Shavuot] program to let people know we exist.”

During the three days, a number of guests commented on the down-to-earth Southern hospitality of the organizers and local residents. “It was a great experience to be invited for yom tov to a community that you don’t know,” said Atara Ross, a clinical social worker from Los Angeles. “Chabad may be warm and welcoming, and invites you to their home, but that doesn’t really give you a sense of the community.”

The retreat organizers did their best to do just that. Besides lectures on religious topics, the program included a talk about the community’s complicated history in a state that once sanctioned slavery, and a panel discussion with four spirited native-born octogenarians who shared their memories growing up in the tight Jewish community, teasing each other with a playful Southern drawl. “We all have that stereotype of the redneck,” Ross remarked. “But after sitting with some of the older residents, I was surprised to hear how well the Jews have been received in the South.”

A second discussion featured several newly retired New York couples who now call Charleston home.

The participants also had an opportunity to tour the historic district in a horse and carriage, and to learn about the long, colorful history of the Jews in South Carolina through old photographs, letters and other documents preserved in the Jewish Heritage Collection at the College of Charleston’s Addlestone Library, just steps from the Francis Marion Hotel, where the guests were staying. Some also visited the Old Slave Mart Museum and a former plantation in the area.

Charleston is one of the oldest Jewish communities in the United States. When John Locke drafted the constitution for the Carolina Colony in 1669, he granted “liberty of conscience to all heathens, Jews and dissenters.” In 1820 there were about 2,000 Jews in South Carolina, and most lived in Charleston. It was the largest Jewish population of any state at the time.

The Jews lived prosperous lives there and built family businesses, some of which are still operating in the historic quarter, including Berlin’s Fine Clothing for Men and Hyman’s Seafood.


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