Offering a Lifeline for Growing Number of Jewish Hungry and Poor

With Poverty Rising, Met Council Funds Outreach to Orthodox

courtesy of masbia

By Rukhl Schaechter

Published June 14, 2013, issue of June 21, 2013.

This story first appeared in the Yiddish Forverts. It was translated into English by Frimet Goldberger.

According to a study by the UJA Federation of New York, the poverty rate of the greater New York Jewish population grew exponentially as of late. More than 560,000 people — 20% of all the Jewish households in the region — live below the poverty level. This is double of what it was in 1991, not considering the 14% growth of the Jewish population since then.

This report also showed that nearly half of all children in Jewish households live under poor, or near-poor, conditions. Older, Russian-speaking folks make up the greatest percentage, followed by Hasidic families and the non-Russian-speaking elders.

When we think of poor people we envision those who cannot afford to put food on the table, or those walking around in tattered clothing. However, this issue is a lot more complicated. The report also takes into account the households that are not officially considered poor, but their income is so low, that they have to reach out for outside help — for both food and housing.

“According to the Federal guidelines, a family of four is considered poor only when its annual income is below $33,000,” said Daniel Amzallag, the Deputy Chief of Staff at Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty, in an interview with the Yiddish Forverts.

“This means that a family of four earning between $33,000 and $55,000 is perhaps not considered poor. But as we see it, these families are also struggling.”

In previous years, 58,000 Jewish households were in need of help. Nearly half of those were not officially poor, Amzallag said.

In order to service both needy groups — those who actually go hungry, and those who struggle financially — the Metropolitan Council partnered with another Jewish organization called Masbia (http://www.masbia.org/).

“We help those who are close to a crisis — the people who have empty refrigerators, and are in serious danger,” said Alexander Rapaport, the founder and manager of Masbia. “At our tables you can find an Israeli fundraising for a Yeshiva in Israel, and a non-Jewish Mexican worker. We treat everyone with respect, whether he is a Jew or not.”

One 102-year-old non-Haredi woman comes in every night from Boro Park, Rapaport added.

The Metropolitan Council, which provides 60% of the Masbia budget, comes to the aid of those who lost their jobs, or those who can no longer afford to pay tuition for their children’s schooling, by helping them apply for Food Stamps and Medicaid.



Would you like to receive updates about new stories?






















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.