'Not One Israeli' in Future Palestine, Mahmoud Abbas Vows

Rejects Settlers — and Trumpets Jerusalem as Capital

Mahmoud Abbas fired a warning shot across the bow of anyone who thought the peace talks would be quick and easy. The Palestinian leader laid out hardline positions on borders, settlers, and Jerusalem.
getty images
Mahmoud Abbas fired a warning shot across the bow of anyone who thought the peace talks would be quick and easy. The Palestinian leader laid out hardline positions on borders, settlers, and Jerusalem.

By Reuters

Published July 29, 2013.

(page 2 of 2)

On the future of Jewish settlements on the West Bank and the status of Jerusalem - among the most contentious issues facing the two sides - Abbas signalled no softening of his stance.

“We’ve already made all the necessary concessions,” he said.

“East Jerusalem is the capital of the state of Palestine … if there were and must be some kind of small exchange (of land) equal in size and value, we are ready to discuss this - no more, no less,” he said.

TERMS OF REFERENCE

Before agreeing to return to talks last week, Palestinian officials were adamant that negotiations should have three main prerequisites: the release of veteran Arab prisoners in Israeli jails, a full settlement freeze and an acknowledgment of the 1967 lines as the basis for future borders.

Israel has publicly granted only one of those demands when its cabinet on Sunday voted by a slim margin to approved the phased release of 104 Arab prisoners.

Abbas said on Monday that he refused to endorse any half-measure whereby he would let Israel freeze construction in smaller, more far-flung settlements but allow it to build in the larger and more populous “blocs” closer to the 1967 lines.

“There was a request, ‘We’ll only build here, what do you think?’ If I agreed, I would legitimize all the rest (of the settlements). I said no. I said out loud and in writing that, to us, settlements in their entirety are illegitimate.”

Asked if the Americans may try to get Israel to agree to a de facto settlement freeze, the president made a broad smile and declined to answer: “I don’t know.”

Palestinian sources say officials remain uncomfortable with the lack of a firm Israeli commitment, publicly or behind closed doors, to meet their remaining expectations.

They say that in talks in the coming days, the Americans hope to satisfy Palestinian objections by issuing a statement declaring the 1967 lines the basis for negotiations, and the United States will attempt to compel the Israelis to endorse their note.

Israeli officials have in public repeatedly refused to accede to the Palestinian demands, calling them preconditions on issues that must be agreed at the end, not the start, of talks.

Senior aide to the president Tayyeb Abdul Rahim, accompanying Abbas, told Reuters, “We’re between too opinions: should Israel agree to stop building settlements, or should they agree to a state on the 1967 borders to go back to talks.

“What’s stronger? (The second) means that all settlements are illegitimate. America is convinced of our point of view … Israel has not yet agreed to a state on the 1967 lines, but it will go to the talks on that basis.”



Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.