As Teens Defect from Shul, Congregations Find Ways to Revamp Programming

Reeling Them Back In, One Jam Session at a Time

Helping Out: Community Synagogue in Rye, N.Y., has ‘radically reinvented its offerings for teens. Here, students help out at Habitat for Humanity.
Courtesy of Community Synagogue
Helping Out: Community Synagogue in Rye, N.Y., has ‘radically reinvented its offerings for teens. Here, students help out at Habitat for Humanity.

By Sarah Seltzer

Published August 27, 2013, issue of August 30, 2013.
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Leaders at religious schools realized that, just as they offer various ways for adult congregants to be involved — whether through volunteering in the community, helping at services or joining the Sisterhood — “now we think of multiple pathways for our teens to stay connected,” says Frankel.

Education directors want to work with kids’ schedules or ambitions — by offering them a chance to fill their schools’ community service requirements, say, or add impressive credentials to their college resumes. Alternatively, some want to give teens with overprogrammed schedules a chance to burn off steam.

“There’s so much stress in high school and these kids can be so overprogrammed. So we hope we can actually be a retreat from all that,” says Rabbi Jordana Schuster Battis of Needham’s Temple Beth Shalom, where the teen program is called “Sha’arim,” or “gates.” She tells the story of a mom who offered her daughter a break from her synagogue activity to alleviate the strain of a busy week but was rebuffed. Her daughter explained: “That’s where I go to escape from all this pressure.”

Crucial to this new model is a re-envisioning of confirmation, from a be-all, end-all event for Jewish teens to an option that can be paired with other programming.

“Teens have a choice of which gate they want to enter learning through, and confirmation is one of those choices,” explains Battis. Other options include wilderness programming in the form of hiking and whitewater rafting, or teaching in elementary school classrooms at the synagogue. The “medium” may change, she says, but the content — Jewish learning — is consistent.

Going out into communities and performing social action, once seen as supplementary to religious education, is now more frequently offered as a “track” in and of itself,

At the Community Synagogue in Rye, electives range from yoga and meditation to community service collaborative programs that include clowning, music and more that may seem “out there” to some. “We have taken teens seriously as Jewish adults,” says Frankel. “We’ve phased the options in — they represent a radical shift in our community. Last year was phase 1; we piloted some new programs. And it may be that some don’t take off, so we’ll try something else.”

Goodman notes that at North Shore Congregation Israel they also have multiple approaches, none of which, she emphasizes, are “siloed.” One is Selah, a group of singers and musicians who study “folk, rock and jazz” as well as liturgical music and lead their own Shabbat and High Holy Day services. Again, the either-or is key: Kids can choose to do Selah instead of or in addition to their grade-level classes. Another option is “mitzvah corps,” a group doing charitable work, and a third option is to help in the classrooms of younger students.

That mentorship option, which many schools have implemented, allows students to perform community service and also to feel like they have a valued role. “When you say to an eighth-grader, we need you, it’s pretty compelling — we’re saying ‘you have something to offer.’ Not to mention that when younger students see older ones staying in school, helping out and gaining stature and authority, they may see a future for themselves beyond the bar mitzvah.

“We’re building a relationship,” says Goodman.

Sarah Marian Seltzer is a writer in New York and a contributor to the Forward’s Sisterhood blog. Find her at www.sarahmseltzer.com


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