Chemical Weapons Watchdog Wins Nobel Peace Prize

UN Group That Pinpointed Syria Attack Works on Shoestring

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By Reuters

Published October 11, 2013.

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The process of destroying chemical weapons can be hazardous and is costly. The chemicals can be burnt, but with care not to disperse poisonous toxins, or chemically neutralised.

“It has always been our position, that quintessentially we work for peace. Not just for peace, we work to strengthen humanitarian norms,” Malik Ellahi, political adviser to the OPCW director general, told Reuters.

“Chemical weapons are horrible things and they must never be used and that contributes not just to disarmament, but to strengthening the humanity within us.”

The Hague-based OPCW was set up in 1997 to implement a 1992 global Chemical Weapons Convention to banish chemical arms. It has about 500 staff and an annual budget under $100 million.

The United States and Russia had committed to destroying their arsenals by 2012 but have as yet failed to do so.

OPCW head Uzumcu told Norway’s NRK television: “I am sure…(the prize) will give encouragement to our staff to demonstrate more what they could do in terms of contributions to global peace and security.”

He said 80 percent of stockpiles under the oversight of the OPCW, excluding Syria, had already been disposed of.

“Still, 20 percent will have to be destroyed,” he said.

Chemical weapons can inflict considerable suffering and death, with choking, chemical burns and convulsions, and can be dispersed easily by winds and affect civilian populations. They were widely used in World War One. More recently, in 1998, 5,000 people were gassed to death by Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein in the town of Halabja.

RUSSIA AND ASSAD

The OPCW only appeared in speculation in the final hours before the prize. Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, shot in the head a year ago by the Taliban, had been the bookmakers’ favourite to win the prize for her campaign for girls’ right to education.

Washington blamed President Assad for the August sarin attack, a charge he denied, while Russian President Vladimir |Putin blamed rebels. Facing the threat of a U.S. military strike, Assad eventually agreed to destroy Syria’s sizeable chemical weapons programme and allow in OPCW inspectors.

President Vladimir Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov said he had no comment on the award. But a senior lawmaker from the ruling United Russia party, Vyacheslav Nikonov, praised the decision and suggested some past awards, an apparent reference to the award to Obama, had been misguided.

“This is one of the best choices made by the Nobel Laureate committee in its history,” Nikonov said on state television.

“They didn’t want to make a mistake this time because there have been too many.”

The $1.25 million prize will be presented in Oslo on Dec. 10, the anniversary of Nobel’s death.

The OPCW, which has 189 member states, said Syria was cooperating and it could eliminate its chemical weapons by mid-2014, provided they received support from all sides in its civil war.

Chemical weapons experts believe Syria has roughly 1,000 tonnes of sarin, mustard and VX nerve gas, some of it stored as bulk raw chemicals and some of it already loaded onto missiles, warheads or rockets.

Under a Russian-U.S. deal struck last month, Syria must render useless all production facilities and weapons-filling equipment by November, a process begun over the past several weeks.



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