Was Germany Complicit in Hiding $1.3B Trove of Art Looted by Nazis?

Jewish Groups Slam Two-Year Silence on Munich Find

Unlikely Trove: A Munich man kept a billion-dollar trove of looted Jewish art in this apartment. Should authorities have done more to report the discovery?
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Unlikely Trove: A Munich man kept a billion-dollar trove of looted Jewish art in this apartment. Should authorities have done more to report the discovery?

By Reuters

Published November 04, 2013.
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A Jewish group accused Germany on Monday of moral complicity in concealment of stolen paintings after it emerged authorities failed for two years to report discovery of a trove of art seized by the Nazis, including works by Picasso and Matisse.

Customs officials’ chance discovery of 1,500 artworks in a Munich flat owned by the reclusive elderly son of a war-time art dealer, was revealed in a report by news magazine Focus over the weekend.

Officials in the southern state of Bavaria declined comment on what could be one of the most significant recoveries of Nazi-looted art. They have called a press conference for Tuesday. German government spokesman Steffen Seibert confirmed the find and said experts were assessing its provenance.

The case poses a legal and moral minefield for authorities. The Nazi regime systematically plundered hundreds of thousands of art works from museums and individuals across Europe. An unknown number of works is still missing, and museums worldwide have held investigations into the origins of their exhibits.

Focus estimated that the works found amongst stacks of hoarded groceries in the flat of Cornelius Gurlitt, could be worth well over 1 billion euros ($1.35 billion). Some, it said, could have been bought by his father Hildebrand from the collections of German state museums. Others were seized, or extorted from persecuted Jewish collectors.

“This case shows the extent of organised art looting which occurred in museums and private collections,” said Ruediger Mahlo, of the Conference on Jewish material claims against Germany, noting private collections were almost all Jewish.

“We demand the paintings be returned to their original owners. It cannot be, as in this case, that what amounts morally to the concealment of stolen goods continues.”

He criticised the lack of transparency in dealing with the case and said it was typical of the attitude towards looted art, which for some Jewish families constitutes the last personal effects of relatives murdered during the Holocaust.

Germany has faced criticism that the restitution process is too complicated and lacks sufficient funding and has set up research schemes.

The Gurlitt haul is also believed to contain a painting of a woman by Henri Matisse which belonged to Paris-based Jewish art collector Paul Rosenberg.

Focus said Cornelius Gurlitt had funded himself by occasionally selling art works and he had a bank account containing half a million euros. He attracted the suspicion of authorities in late 2010 when they found him travelling from Zurich to Munich with a large, albeit legal, amount of cash.


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