Negotiating Our Way Out of Catastrophe

What Can We Learn From World War II About Peace Talks?

getty images

By J.J. Goldberg

Published January 26, 2014, issue of January 31, 2014.
  • Print
  • Share Share
  • Multi Page

Sometimes it’s the smaller milestones that teach the bigger lessons. Take this past January 22. It was the 70th anniversary of Executive Order 9417, issued in 1944 by Franklin D. Roosevelt to create the War Refugee Board, tasked with rescuing European Jews from the Nazi death machine. During the remaining 16 months until the European war ended in May 1945, it’s estimated to have saved about 200,000 lives.

The anniversary didn’t make quite the same splash as, say, the 50th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination or the 150th anniversary of Gettysburg. Actually, it passed almost unnoticed. That’s a pity. It’s worth a second look. It has a lot to teach us about the current moment in history.

This is an unusual moment for America. After a decade of entanglement in two ground wars, we’re now engaged in three separate negotiating processes, each addressing a different deadly international dispute. One is the six-power negotiation with Iran in Geneva over halting its nuclear weapons program. The second is the international conference, also in Geneva, to stop the carnage of the Syrian civil war. The third is the latest round of Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations.

It’s hard to think of another time when three such urgent diplomatic processes were going on at once. They have different timelines, different casts of characters and different issues under dispute. But all involve global stakes.

All three reflect, at least partly, the Muslim world’s traumatic, often violent process of adjustment to modernity. All three concern the same 1,000-mile stretch of the Middle East between Jerusalem and Tehran. And right now, for better or worse, they’re all Barack Obama-John Kerry productions.

But they’re not the same. One pits an Iran with great-power ambitions against a rare, painstakingly constructed coalition of global powers determined to trim Iran’s sails. The second addresses a local Syrian protest that escalated into a flashpoint in the centuries-old conflict between Sunnis and Shiites, dragging in various regional and global allies. The third is even more local, involving a territorial dispute between Israelis and Palestinians, but echoes globally because of the passions it evokes throughout the Muslim world and beyond.

None of these disputes is World War II redux, despite what you sometimes hear. None involves a nation or axis of nations with the ambition, much less the power, to conquer and enslave the world as Germany and Japan tried to do. None involves a nation remotely capable of exterminating the world’s Jews.

Iran, you say? The director of Israel’s Mossad intelligence agency, Tamir Pardo, declared publicly in December 2011 that Iran is “not an existential threat” to Israel. The Israeli military chief of staff, Benny Gantz, stated publicly in April 2012 that Iran’s leaders are “very rational,” not self-destructive. And Pardo and Gantz, you’ll recall, were both chosen in 2011 to replace predecessors who hadn’t sufficiently shared Prime Minister Netanyahu’s Iranophobia.

But if none of the three disputes shares the essential characteristics of the Nazi threat, each of them features one of its traits. Iran aspires to acquire armaments of enormous power, which would greatly increase the reach of its regional ambitions. Syria has proven able and willing to slaughter vast numbers of innocent civilians, on a scale that shocks even the hardened conscience of our cynical age. And the continuation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict puts the living heart of contemporary Jewish civilization at risk. Nazism did all three.

What can the War Refugee Board teach us? To answer that, we need to recall what the board wasn’t. For one thing, it wasn’t formed in August 1942, when word first reached the West of the Nazis’ plan to exterminate the Jews. It would take another 18 months of furious Washington bureaucratic trench warfare for advocates of rescue — mostly Jewish organizational leaders and Treasury Department officials — to overcome deliberate State Department obstruction.

Perhaps history would have turned out differently had the board been formed in November 1942, as soon as American intelligence confirmed the reported Nazi genocide. Or after the Allies issued their joint declaration on December 17, 1942, published on Page 1 of the New York Times, condemning Germany’s “bestial policy of cold-blooded extermination” of “the Jewish people in Europe” and vowing “practical measures” to “insure that those responsible for these crimes shall not escape retribution.” Or perhaps in January 1943, after the World Jewish Congress submitted the first concrete rescue plan, a $600,000 Romanian ransom offer.

But it wasn’t. Instead the State Department was put in charge of rescue plans, which were studiously dismissed, sabotaged or stalled by officials who we now know were contemptuous of Jewish lives. It wasn’t until July 1943 that the ransom offer was brought to Treasury officials. They began gathering evidence of State Department sabotage. That led to congressional hearings in November, a State-Treasury showdown in December and, finally, the president’s order in January to create the board under Treasury’s supervision, not State’s.

What if rescue had begun earlier? With twice as much time, maybe twice as many Jews would have been rescued — perhaps 500,000 or more. Perhaps with momentum and creativity, 1 million precious lives could have been saved, twice the Jewish population of what was then Palestine.

And today we would remember 5 million martyrs, and the Holocaust would still be history’s greatest evil. Nazi Germany was bent on conquering the world and ridding it of Jews, and it nearly did so. There are tragedies in the world, and acts of human evil, that cannot be wished away.

Americans were noisily unwilling to join a European war in 1939. Certainly not to save Jews. Congress refused even to suspend immigration quotas. If Japan hadn’t attacked America — and Germany hadn’t attacked Russia — Hitler would have won. It took a mobilized world and tens of millions dead to stop him.

But then, if it hadn’t been for the lunacy of World War I, Germans wouldn’t have turned to Hitler — nor would Britain and France been so reluctant to take up arms in a timely manner.

Just so, if America hadn’t invaded Iraq to bring the ill-conceived caravan of democracy to the Middle East, the peoples of Egypt and Syria likely wouldn’t have risen up to join the caravan and 130,000 Syrians would still be alive. Iran would still be quaking in fear of Saddam Hussein. And Americans wouldn’t be so reluctant to enter another war.

But we did invade Iraq, and chaos did spread through the region, and Iran was rid of its great enemy. And Americans don’t want to enter another war. Certainly not for the Jews. Let’s pray for Geneva.

Contact J.J. Goldberg at goldberg@forward.com


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • According to Israeli professor Mordechai Kedar, “the only thing that can deter terrorists, like those who kidnapped the children and killed them, is the knowledge that their sister or their mother will be raped."
  • Why does ultra-Orthodox group Agudath Israel of America receive its largest donation from the majority owners of Walmart? Find out here: http://jd.fo/q4XfI
  • Woody Allen on the situation in #Gaza: It's “a terrible, tragic thing. Innocent lives are lost left and right, and it’s a horrible situation that eventually has to right itself.”
  • "Mark your calendars: It was on Sunday, July 20, that the momentum turned against Israel." J.J. Goldberg's latest analysis on Israel's ground operation in Gaza:
  • What do you think?
  • "To everyone who is reading this article and saying, “Yes, but… Hamas,” I would ask you to just stop with the “buts.” Take a single moment and allow yourself to feel this tremendous loss. Lay down your arms and grieve for the children of Gaza."
  • Professor Dan Markel, 41 years old, was found shot and killed in his Tallahassee home on Friday. Jay Michaelson can't explain the death, just grieve for it.
  • Employees complained that the food they received to end the daily fast during the holy month of Ramadan was not enough (no non-kosher food is allowed in the plant). The next day, they were dismissed.
  • Why are peace activists getting beat up in Tel Aviv? http://jd.fo/s4YsG
  • Backstreet's...not back.
  • Before there was 'Homeland,' there was 'Prisoners of War.' And before there was Claire Danes, there was Adi Ezroni. Share this with 'Homeland' fans!
  • BREAKING: Was an Israeli soldier just kidnapped in Gaza? Hamas' military wing says yes.
  • What's a "telegenically dead" Palestinian?
  • 13 Israeli soldiers die in Gaza — the deadliest day for the IDF in decades. So much for 'precision' strikes and easy exit strategies.
  • What do a Southern staple like okra and an Israeli favorite like tahini have in common? New Orleans chef Alon Shaya brings sabra tastes to the Big Easy.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.