Anne Heyman's Son Gets Poignant Welcome at Rwanda School

Agahozo-Shalom Wipes Tears Away for Late Founder

Mom’s Mission: Jonathan Merrin, second from left, attends an HIV-AIDS awareness event with fellow Young Judaea volunteers and students at the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village in Rwanda.
courtesy of asyv
Mom’s Mission: Jonathan Merrin, second from left, attends an HIV-AIDS awareness event with fellow Young Judaea volunteers and students at the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village in Rwanda.

By Hody Nemes

Published February 22, 2014.

A groundbreaking Rwandan school for genocide orphans has welcomed the son of founder Anne Heyman with open arms — just three weeks after the Jewish philanthropist was killed in a tragic horse-riding accident in Florida.

Jonathan Merrin, 19, arrived at the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village this week as part of a month-long service trip with other Jewish students on the Young Judaea post-high school program. Heyman’s nephew, Ben Bronstein, joined him on the volunteer trip.

“Jonathan is such a brave young man,” Jean-Claude Nkulikiyimfura, the school’s director, told the Forward from the campus outside the Rwandan capital of Kigali. “I can only imagine how difficult it is for him, because every place in this village is a constant reminder of his mother. But I believe that along the way it will make hims much stronger.

Merrin, Bronstein, and the other Young Judaea students are helping the school organize its facility and working on construction projects, including building a small bridge on the campus and a house for a family in the surrounding community.

“They are doing a wonderful job of helping out in the village and also helping out in the community,” Nkulikiyimfura said, and added that Merrin is throwing himself into the work along with the other students. “He always wants to be part of the group. He doesn’t want to be treated special.”

The Young Judaea volunteers are also spending time with the school’s 500 students, who are orphans of the horrific 1994 Rwandan genocide which claimed the lives of hundreds of thousands.

The students have made their gratitude to Merrin clear, noting that his trip is a reassuring sign of the family’s determination to continue to support the project even after her death.

“He is giving a message, not by talking but his action, that he shares a vision and heart by his mother,” said Emmanuel Nkundunkundiye, 21, a recent graduate of Agahozo-Shalom.

“For us, he’s representing his family and they are giving us a message that the whole family is going to work together to honor Anne’s life and legacy by carrying on what she was doing.”



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