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Fatigue in Fatigues: Long deployments contribute to difficult reentry for U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq.
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Fatigue in Fatigues: Long deployments contribute to difficult reentry for U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq.

By Jared T. Miller

Published March 04, 2014, issue of March 07, 2014.

(page 4 of 4)

Haimov and others from NATAL will begin training another cohort of volunteers for WWP Talk in February, and given the results so far, both parties are optimistic about the future. WWP’s Dave Ward said another year will give the program time to mature in Jacksonville, but there is talk of possible future programs to address western time zones, probably based out of Colorado, once the program strengthens its base of volunteers and serves increasing numbers of veterans. He estimated that “well over 100,000” wounded veterans will seek WWP’s help in the next two or three years.

“We’re looking to impact as many warriors’ lives as possible,” Ward said. “We couldn’t have had anybody better to help us put this program in place than [NATAL].”

“For me, it is so important that the American society recognizes the needs of those soldiers, and the price they are paying for being deployed for such a long time,” Haimov said. “I’m hoping we can help them as much as we can help our own warriors.”

Jared T. Miller is a freelance journalist based in New York City. He has written for Time, the New York Daily News and GlobalPost, among other publications.



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