James Schlesinger, Who Served 3 U.S. Presidents, Dies at 85

Held Top Posts at CIA, Pentagon and Energy Department

Getty Images

By Reuters

Published March 27, 2014.

(page 2 of 2)

‘AN EXTRAORDINARY PATRIOT’

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Schlesinger “leaves behind a remarkable legacy of accomplishment and service that will ensure his place in history alongside our country’s great statesmen.”

“I relied on his counsel when I was a United States senator and as secretary of defense have benefited enormously from his experience, his guidance, and his strategic thinking as a member of the Defense Policy Board,” Hagel said in a statement.

U.S. Senator John McCain of Arizona, a leading Republican figure in Congress on national security matters and his party’s 2008 presidential nominee, lauded Schlesinger, whom he called “my friend and adviser.” McCain said Schlesinger “dedicated his life to protecting America’s national security.”

Former U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, the 2000 Democratic vice presidential nominee, added: “Jim Schlesinger was a good and gifted man and an extraordinary patriot and public servant. Over the years, I benefited greatly from his informed judgment and wise counsel.”

Born Feb. 29, 1929 in New York City, Schlesinger went to Harvard University, earning a Ph.D. in economics in 1956. He taught at the University of Virginia, published items on national security and worked for RAND Corp as director of strategic studies.

After serving as deputy budget director and chairman of the Atomic Energy Committee, he became director of the Central Intelligence Agency in February 1973 under Nixon.

His six-month tenure was rocky. He succeeded Richard Helms, a respected and popular director who was fired because he would not go along with Nixon’s actions in the Watergate scandal.

Schlesinger launched a drive for major organizational and personnel overhaul, which put him at odds with many at the agency. Word had it that he was so unpopular that a security camera had to be installed across from his official portrait for fear it would be vandalized.

Nixon moved him to the Defense Department at the relatively young age of 44. When he left nearly 2-1/2 years later, he was replaced by the youngest defense secretary ever, Donald Rumsfeld.

Carter became president in 1977 after a campaign in which he stressed fixing America’s energy problems, and he picked Schlesinger as his special adviser on the issue.

Later in that year when Congress established the Energy Department, Carter named him as its first secretary.

Schlesinger left that post in 1979 and returned to lecturing and writing and served on a number of boards and commissions, including being named to the Homeland Security Advisory Council after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

He returned to public service in 2008 and the chance to serve a fourth president, Republican George W. Bush, when he was picked to lead a panel looking at ways to improve control over the U.S. nuclear arsenal.



Would you like to receive updates about new stories?






















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.