New York City Stonewalls Forward on Metzitzah B'peh Circumcision Regulations

Babies Are Sickened — But City Won't Give Info

Tradition? Rabbi Avrohom Cohn performs a bris at a synagogue in Brooklyn’s Boro Park. He says he performed the controversial metzitzah bpeh ritual, but did not get consent from the parents.
courtesy of avrohom cohn
Tradition? Rabbi Avrohom Cohn performs a bris at a synagogue in Brooklyn’s Boro Park. He says he performed the controversial metzitzah bpeh ritual, but did not get consent from the parents.

By Paul Berger

Published April 24, 2014, issue of May 02, 2014.

(page 2 of 2)

But he said that he would never seek parental consent, because he believes it is an infringement of his religious liberties.

He called the claim that MBP poses a risk to infants a blood libel.

After publishing Cohn’s statement, the Forward asked the health department, “In light of Rabbi Cohn’s statements and actions, will the [health department] be taking action to try to prevent more cases of MBP-related herpes and/or to enforce its consent form rule?”

But the department will not respond.

Under the new regulation, mohels must keep signed copies of the forms for one year.

The health department has previously said that it has never sanctioned or fined a mohel for failing to comply with the consent form rule.

But the department will not say whether it has ever checked if mohels are complying with the rule. To do so, it would simply ask mohels who practice MBP for copies of signed forms they have collected.

The Forward filed a request in February, under New York State’s Freedom of Information Law, asking whether the health department had ever requested such forms and, if so, how many forms it had asked for. The Forward also wanted to see redacted copies of such forms.

The city responded by refusing to confirm or deny whether it had ever asked for such forms. The city added that if such forms did exist, because of privacy concerns they could not be released.

Before he became mayor of New York City, Bill de Blasio blasted city agencies for failing to respond to Freedom of Information requests.

“We have to start holding government accountable when it refuses to turn over public records to citizens and taxpayers,” de Blasio said when he was public advocate, in April 2013.

The Forward appealed the city’s decision March 26.

Under the state’s Freedom of Information Law, the city was required to respond within 10 business days of receiving the appeal. It failed to do so, and more than 20 business days later has yet to respond.

Contact Paul Berger at berger@forward.com or on Twitter, @pdberger



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