Star of the Show That Inspired 'Homeland' Discusses How TV Affected Reality in Israel

Adi Ezroni Sees the World Through the Eyes of 'Prisoners'


By Sigal Samuel

Published July 15, 2014, issue of August 01, 2014.

“Prisoners of War,” the Israeli TV drama that inspired “Homeland,” will be released on DVD in the United States on July 8 — and the timing couldn’t be better. “POW” concerns three Israeli soldiers who finally get to return to their families after 17 years in captivity, only to discover that life in the public eye is its own sort of prison. It’s an issue that’s recently been in the news, particularly here in the U.S., where American soldier Bowe Bergdahl was freed from Taliban captivity by means of a controversial prisoner swap.

Adi Ezroni, an Israeli actress and producer known for her documentary work on child trafficking, plays one of the lead roles in “POW”: Yael Ben-Horin, the sister of a captured soldier who is presumed dead but who continues to visit her in ghostly apparitions. (We soon find out that he’s alive and, like Nicholas Brody of “Homeland,” questioning his loyalty toward his country.) Ezroni sat down with the Forward to talk about “POW,” “Homeland,” and how each show shapes the public conversation about real prisoners of war.

Sigal Samuel: Before “POW” was released, there was an uproar in the Israeli media. The public didn’t want you to touch this subject while a real-life Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit, was in captivity. Then everyone fell in love with the show. Why?

Adi Ezroni: You fear what you don’t know. The biggest fear for people was how such a sensitive subject was going to be handled. Once they saw that it was handled with integrity and knowledge, then it was a double whammy: It had such a strong anchor in reality, and it allowed people to deal with the subject in a way that they wouldn’t have otherwise.

In the DVD’s special features, your co-star Ishai Golan says “POW” “contributed enormously to the release of Gilad Shalit and to the whole public opinion about prisoners of war.” Do you agree?

Definitely. Gilad Shalit was already in everyone’s hearts, but having such a highly rated TV show meant people were talking about it on a daily basis. It propelled and energized the campaign to release him. And then when he was released, it allowed a much more mature way of welcoming him back, in terms of both the general public and the media.

After broaching the topic of what happens to prisoners when they come back, after seeing the difficulties of reintegration and rehabilitation — things that were never really discussed in Israel before — there was an added respect for their privacy. There could’ve been a huge media frenzy, but rather than gossip and paparazzi, it almost felt like, “Okay, we just went through this fictionally, and here it is happening in reality — and we know how to deal with it better.”

With prisoner swaps, there’s always a debate over whether the price a country has to pay is worth it. Did “POW” impact that debate?

The show definitely impacted the discourse. But in Israel, because it’s a country that’s smaller than New Jersey, there’s already a very personal connection to the prisoner. With Gilad Shalit, you feel like you know his family. You are his parents, you are his sibling. The face of the prisoner is much more a part of your life. Here [in the United States], I don’t think many people know how many [American] POWs there are. I don’t think people knew who Bergdahl was before he was released.



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