LOST IN TRANSITION

By Ariel Zilber

Published December 26, 2003, issue of December 26, 2003.

Judith Brodsky has never been shy about tackling controversial issues. The printmaker has used her art to decry the environmentally corrosive effects of industrialization in New Jersey and to examine the struggle for gender equality in the curatorial profession.

In “Memoir of an Assimilated Family,” on display at the Aljira arts center, Brodsky looks inward, putting her Jewish heritage on display. Visitors to the exhibit have a chance to view more than 100 photos with captions telling her family’s history — a story that includes surviving pogroms in Ukraine, escaping the horrors of the Holocaust and immigration to the United States. She also incorporates simple pictures of family members including photos and glowing descriptions her father and glowing descriptions of him.

Brodsky’s work has been exhibited at more than 100 museums and permanent collections. She is professor emerita at Rutgers University’s Mason Gross School of the Arts and the founding director of the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper.

Aljira, 591 Broad St., Newark, N.J.; Jan. 8-Mar. 31, $5 suggested donation. (973-622-1600 or www.aljira.org)



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