Ben Ehrlich

Rock Stars Hit Jerusalem

Several high-profile musical acts are set to rock the holiest city in the Holy Land. The concert, “Jerusalem Rocks!” will take place September 9 at Teddy Kollek Stadium. Billboard Top 40 powerhouse the Black Eyed Peas (who have won three Grammys in the past three years) will headline the bill, which also features progressive hip-hop collective Arrested Development (the group, which won two Grammys in 1993, will release a long-awaited reunion album October 30). The event’s organizers hope to re-establish Jerusalem as an international center of culture.

Making Progress, Bit by (Rib)Bit

In their research on Fanconi anemia, Maureen Hoatlin and her four associates at the Oregon Health & Science University have been getting groundbreaking help from a small, slimy source. Hoatlin’s lab has shown that the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) has Fanconi genes and can be used to understand the complex set of proteins that protects our cells from cancer. “The normal function of the Fanconi genes is not completely understood,” Hoatlin explained, “but every time a cell replicates, damage can occur, and Fanconi genes are somehow preventing that damage.”

Big Brother is Watching You

CBS found itself in hot water last week. The 24-hour microphones and cameras on the network’s reality-TV show “Big Brother 8” caught contestant Amber Siyavus Tomcavage talking in whispers. “The majority of Jewish people I know, my gosh, so many are so selfish,” she said to another contestant. “So weird.” The 27-year-old Las Vegas cocktail waitress also said she was taught that one can tell who is Jewish “by their last name” and “by their nose.” The statements did not air on CBS, but appeared on both the “Big Brother” after-show feed on the Showtime channel and on the live Internet feed.

Success Is in the Cards

Fans of the Israel Baseball League can now take their favorite players home with them. Forty-two top players from the nascent league have their images on baseball cards that kids (and adults) can collect, trade and “flip.” Each card contains a brief player bio printed on the back in both English and Hebrew.

Teachers Take Their Lessons Behind Bars for Jewish Prisoners

Rabbinical students Yisroel Silverstein of Brooklyn and Reuven Brody of Miami Beach, Fla., with their black hats and beards, must have looked out of place this summer on “The Farm.” The Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola, La., which earned its nickname because it is still a working farm, is the largest and perhaps most infamous prison in the United States, with 5,000 inmates. Known for its swampy swelter and constant flooding, the Farm is hardly an Edenic vacation destination. But for Silverstein, 19, and Brody, 20, it was just another stop on a road trip that spanned 20 prisons from Alabama to Oklahoma.

Etiquette Maven Minds Your Manners

By day, Lorie Rudolph disguises herself as an unassuming insurance agent. “It has to pay the bills,” she said of her job. But come nights and weekends, the 53-year-old from Fayetteville, N.Y., transforms herself into the Jewish Etiquette Maven.

Leading Lady’s Power Serve

Rachel Wacholder spends nearly all her time on the beach, but not to escape the grind of her day job. On the contrary, the beach is where Wacholder works as a professional volleyball player and as the star of the Association of Volleyball Professionals tour. “I grew up on the beach,” the Jewish native of Laguna Beach, Calif., told The Shmooze during a phone call from Austria, where she is competing in an Olympic qualifying event with partner Tyra Turner.

Soccer Stars Sign Big

Galaxy superstar David Beckham wasn’t the only one to don a new jersey in Los Angeles last Saturday; Israeli defenseman Tal Ben Haim started one of his first games for the opposing club, Chelsea, before being substituted out of the exhibition match at the end of the first half. In one of the highlights of Chelsea’s 1-0 victory, 25-year-old Ben Haim set up teammate Ricardo Carvalho with a beautiful give-and-go for a near goal that rocketed off the outside of the net.

Ferry: Antisemitic? ‘Ludicrous!’

British musician Bryan Ferry, founder and lead vocalist of the art-rock group Roxy Music, is known for his smooth visual and vocal style. His clumsy tongue, however, has recently been giving the 1970s icon headaches: In a March interview with German newspaper Welt am Sonntag, Ferry professed admiration for the Nazi aesthetic. “My God, the Nazis knew how to put themselves in the limelight and present themselves,” he said in an interview with the paper. “Leni Riefenstahl’s movies and Albert Speer’s buildings and the mass parades and the flags — just amazing. Really beautiful.”

Playing Politics

Although former president Bill Clinton fooled around with, among other things, a tenor saxophone, politics and music are nonetheless strange bedfellows. But Danny Ross doesn’t care. The 23-year-old singer/songwriter, who just released his first album, “Introducing Danny Ross!” also works as a staffer for New York City Congressman Jerrold Nadler. “I run the office,” Ross told the Forward, “and I’m also the congressman’s scheduler.”