Eric Herschthal

Restaurateur: Logo a No-go

In a corner of Manhattan’s East Village there sits an unassuming little Chinese dumpling restaurant that has had a short but lively two-year existence.

Leftist Rocker Sings His Country’s Praises

In New York to kick off a tour of the United States, Israeli rocker Aviv Geffen visited Columbia University last Tuesday, but not with guitar in hand. Geffen is on the road singing Israel’s praises, not his latest hits.

D'oh, It's a Golem

This year “The Simpsons” is incorporating the golem story into the program’s traditional Halloween trilogy — with the inimitable Fran Drescher providing the voice of the ghoulish monster of Yiddish lore.

FDR Kin in an Unlikely Spot: A Rabbi’s Pulpit

It isn’t often that a community can say that its rabbi’s American past goes back further than the country’s first synagogue. Or that its rabbi had ancestors who landed in New Amsterdam in the 1640s. Or, for that matter, that its rabbi’s great-grandfather was Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the 32nd president of the United States.

GOP’s Fla. Recount Diva Gives Dems Ammunition

Democrats are hoping to swing several tightly contested congressional races by seizing on controversial comments made by Rep. Katherine Harris, best known for her role during the 2000 recount in Florida.

Iris Ovshinsky, 79, Alternative-energy Executive

Iris Ovshinsky, co-founder of an influential alternative-energy company, drowned August 16 while swimming in a pond near her home in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. She was 79.

New Fanconi Genes Found

Two new genes related to Fanconi anemia were discovered in August 2005, bringing to 11 the number of genes identified as having links to the disease.

A Star Historian Opens a New Chapter: Jewish Slaveowners

More than a decade ago, pioneering historian Natalie Zemon Davis was trudging through German archives, performing research for her book “Women on the Margins: Three Seventeenth-Century Lives.” Published in 1995 and universally praised, the book was seen as vintage Davis: scholarly, but not impenetrable; groundbreaking, but not immoderate.

Traveling Teachers Save Schools Across the South

A dozen students will be confirmed next spring at B’nai Israel, a Conservative synagogue in Pensacola, Fla. While the occasion is cause for celebration, it is also cause for concern: When those students are confirmed, B’nai Israel’s Sunday school will lose nearly half its students, and the congregation will no longer be able to pay its one salaried educator.