Joseph Carman

Paying Homage to a Mentor

When choreographer Zvi Gotheiner left Israel in 1976 to come to New York, he was a young protégé of his dance teacher, Gertrud Kraus. Often considered to be the first lady of Israeli dance, Kraus taught dance not as a bland curriculum but as the making of art. Despite the fact that Kraus died 30 years ago, Gotheiner still feels the power of her wisdom. From March 14 to March 18, under the sponsorship of Manhattan’s 92nd Street Y, Zvi Gotheiner and Dancers is presenting the premiere of “Gertrud,” a tribute to his late teacher, at the Ailey Citigroup Theater at the Joan Weill Center for Dance, located midtown at 55th Street and Ninth Avenue.

A Dance Pioneer Gets Her Due

Anna Sokolow’s name may not seem familiar, not even to diehard New Yorkers. But her legacy has been felt — directly or indirectly — by nearly every choreographer since the mid-20th century. An artist who probed deeply into social and political issues, Sokolow also demonstrated a startling versatility: as a teacher and mentor at The Juilliard School; as a choreographer who scrutinized events, from the Holocaust to the alienation of youth in the 1960s; as an instrumental advocate for establishing modern dance in Israel, and with her groundbreaking input as a choreographer and director for such Broadway theater hits as Kurt Weill’s “Street Scene” and the rock musical “Hair.” On December 10, Manhattan’s 92nd Street Y presents the Sokolow Theatre Dance Ensemble in “70 Years of Sokolow at the 92nd Street Y,” a tribute to the long-term partnership, which began in 1936, between the institution and the late choreographer.

Israeli Dance Invades Lincoln Center Fest

The Lincoln Center Festival, celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, showcases globally diverse artistic troupes that have distinctive performance styles. In keeping with that ideal, Nigel Redden, the festival’s director, has booked performances by three contemporary Israeli dance companies that represent the vivid intensity and cerebral

Disjointed Poetry

When Heidi Latsky was 11 years old, her mother suffered a meningioma, a brain tumor that led to her slow and ultimately fatal physical decline. For the next 35 years, the odyssey that Latsky, her family and her mother experienced until her death in 2004 elicited a maze of thoughts, memories and emotions. From May 11 to May 14 at Danspace Project

Fragmented Memories

Throughout her childhood, Deborah Damast heard bits and pieces of stories about her father’s escape from Krakow, Poland, before the Nazi invasion. As a choreographer, she felt that there was an important statement in dance to be gleaned from that material, but she didn’t want to exploit anyone else’s experience. The brutal assault of

Finding Comedy in the Conflict

When choreographer David Dorfman toured with his dance company, he often sought out local rabbis to ask, “Who are the chosen people?” After listening to a thoughtful response, Dorfman’s standard follow-up question was, “Does that mean everyone else is un-chosen?” An obsession with questioning belief systems — and a healthy sense of

Reclaiming ‘The Dybbuk’

In 1974 Jerome Robbins premiered an enigmatic choreographic work, “The Dybbuk,” for New York City Ballet. A collaboration with Leonard Bernstein, it was based loosely on the play of the same name by S. Ansky about spirit possession and exorcism. On April 5 at the War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco Ballet will

Kafka on the Dance Floor

Paul Lazar and his wife, Annie-B Parson, never questioned whether the spoken text of live theater and the pure kinetics of dance could create a perfect marriage. Lazar, the actor, and Parson, the dancer and choreographer, formed Big Dance Theater in 1991 to mine and to combine the elements of both art forms into a unique formula. The

Celebrating Balanchine by Channeling His Antithesis

On June 18, Russian choreographer Boris Eifman will premiere his first ballet for the venerable New York City Ballet as part of a program to celebrate what would have been George Balanchine’s 100th birthday. At least in one respect, the match might seem to make sense: Eifman’s own company, the Eifman ballet, is based in Balanchine’s native

Dancing in Eden

Choreographer Paul Taylor has never demonstrated any fondness for religion. But in his latest premiere, “In the Beginning,” he uses his satirical wit as the primary narrative voice for the book of Genesis. The ballet, which made its New York City debut with the Paul Taylor Dance Company at City Center on March 3 and will subsequently be seen