Toby Appleton Perl

Israeli Artists Zoom In on Commercial Success

With three major photography exhibits currently on view in Jerusalem and in Tel Aviv, an upcoming one-man show slated for Israeli marvel Barry Frydlender at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art this month and a major survey of Israeli photographers currently at New York’s Jewish Museum, Israeli video and photo artists are on display as never before. Indeed, lens-based art has become the hot new medium for many homegrown Israeli artists, allowing them to reach unprecedented creative — and commercial — heights on the international scene.

The Last Word

Joseph Friedenson is anxious. A deadline is approaching, and he’s got to put the next edition of Dos Yiddishe Vort to bed. Never mind that he hasn’t missed a deadline — in 54 years. He’s still worried.

Jewish Life Under the Microscope

Video can be a harsh, unforgiving and literal medium. But Israeli artist Michal Rovner’s work is refreshingly distinct from much of the contemporary crop of edgy video art that is designed to offend and upset. In Fields, her current exhibit at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, she has transformed the medium into a subtle and sensual instrument for the

O Lord, Thank You for Amsterdam

Rembrandt’s Jews By Steven Nadler The University of Chicago Press, 250 pages, $25. * * *|Jewish life in pre-Enlightenment Christian Europe is generally recalled as a long, sad catalogue of grievances — familiar and depressing tales of banishment and persecution allayed only by sustained Jewish resilience. But at a time when Jews were

At What Price Art?

In 1974, renowned architect Louis Kahn was found dead in a men’s room at New York’s Penn Station. The circumstances of the death of Kahn, a secretive man, only compounded the mysteries that surrounded his life. Bankrupt, he was on his way home from India, having completed plans for one of his greatest architectural achievements, the National